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I need some advice

I got into UE4 a couple years ago and use it on and off, Usually when i get bored of gaming I can come to UE4 and enjoy myself. Being a gamer at heart I am more critical of what I make. I see games made by other solo like this for example

that by no means is a complete product, but yet anything i try to create ends up being anything on that kind of level.
What are some things I can do to be able to do things like that? Any suggestions on simple things to develop to increase my skills? I have a specific kind of game in mind i would love to make, but i just do not have the skills for it. Any advice on developing more complex games is appreciated!

Not sure what will help here… But anyway here goes…

Having a few stories / game concepts that you want to see made into games - helps keep you motivated.
Building a game on-top of a series of basic working templates helps too (marketplace / community-tools)…
Playing lots of great games in-between moments of game dev may actually make making games harder!

making games takes a long time, especially as they get more complicated. what do you do when you get bored of working on a particular game? do you start another or take a break from unreal altogether?

Have a search for past threads about ‘motivation’. You might find tips that work for you there. Example:

https://forums.unrealengine.com/comm…s-indies-going

Ask yourself what makes you want to create a game in the first place, because it seems cool / easy???
Or because you’ve a life long dream / passion, so you must do it, or because its on your bucket list etc…

Its a really tricky question. You’re not supposed to leave projects unfinished as that reinforces bad habits.
But what if you’re stuck? - If the project is advanced (>50%), its ok to start a new one, just don’t start 20!
Taking a break is important, as are ‘well timed holidays’. Creativity requires brain space to solve things!

Making games takes time, it really takes a lot of time and effort to finish a game. The best advice i can give you is to be organized and realistic about what can you achieve with the budget you have, skill set and team mates, then you can go from there!

Well I have decided now to not worry about it looking pretty, as i am more of a bluprinter, I can give it to someone else for that. And i’ll definitely try not to run multiple projects at a time!

In my own experience, which is all I can really comment on, since I started developing games part time I have started several different projects. All of which I have yet to finish (and will not). For different reasons of course. Some projects were just too ambitious from the start and I burned out a long the way. Some projects I was excited about when I first started, but I eventually lost interest in it. After that, working on the project was more of a chore than it was fun.

However, after having quit several projects for different reasons, I have finally found the one that I believe is the “one”. I say that because I have been working on it for 2 years now without faultering and I more excited about the project than I was when I first started. Progress has come a long way.

So maybe it just takes time and some experimentation before you actually find something you want to stick with. I think sometimes all you can do is be persistent and learn from your experience. An unfinished project isn’t a total loss if you learned some things a long the way.

I agree with @franktech
I think if you have a story and narrative you can move to character movement abilities. Create widget, environment and sound. If you have a story outlined cinematic sequence of events. You can start to direct your project. Im at that point right now. Where im in the sequencer. I have 3 projects set up. One is just for cinematic recording, and is better looking than the game. I personally spend too much time polishing, and fretting over performance, level design, and gameplay. Constantly looking to add a different mechanic, Gameplay, or ability. Finding something artsy that’s out of place etc.