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Feeling Overwhelmed

I am starting to regret even purchasing this. I really want to make a game, but have no idea where to start. I’ve been into music production for over 20 years, and maybe this just isn’t for me? Should I take a course or what? I’ve spent the last week just opening the marketplace content and browsing around in the levels.

Making a game is by no means easy. Especially if you have no prior experience in this field
Eventually it comes down, how bad you want to make your own games. If you really want that, you shouldn’t give up too early. I know it is quite daunting. But eventually you can get there.

You should start with the video tutorials. These are easy to follow and well done.

Disregarding prodigies like Mozart, who seemed to be born with the natural ability to create and compose music - most people do not learn music by firstly writing musical notation or creating a song. They often learn by understanding what cords/keys/etc. make which base notes, and then maybe move on to playing “Mary Had A Little Lamb”.

Take the same approach with making a game. Instead of trying to make a game right off the bat, learn your keys(UI), then try to reproduce something that you see in example levels - like placing a hardwood floor, or editing a particular material to be more shiny than rough. It will begin to piece together, even if you don’t realize it at first.

Trying to jump in and make a game is way too big of an undertaking. Just my suggestion.

Well I want to start a blank level and build some things. I want to use assets from some of the marketplace content. I just can’t figure out why something that should be as simple as browsing to the other level’s content folder is so hard? When I go to their folders they are empty.

Perhaps this link will help you:

https://answers.unrealengine.com/questions/19691/how-do-i-get-access-to-all-assetts-in-the-content.html

So I need to open each project and import them to my level?

Hi There ColdKiller78,

Have you had a chance to watch the video tutes in the official youtube channel?

This one is probably a good one to start with:

Well, you’re just starting out… I’m not sure what you were expecting… I’m just starting out with ue4 as well, it requires some patience… I would recommend beginning at zero and go up from there. Trust me, it’s more satisfying that way. Watch the getting started videos on youtube, and then the blueprint videos and make an extremely simple game where you press a button and a light turns on…then a game where you open a door and get out of a room :slight_smile: And on and on from there… And ask questions when you’re stuck.

Kinda just building on what everyone else is saying. Unreal is a Godsend in awesome features and other things if you know what your doing. But it is by no means press a button and make the game for me solution. There is still a ton of work to be put into a project, especially if your the only one working on it. But be glad they did 95% of the hard “boring” work for you.

You didn’t became a musician by paying $19, did you?

No, but today’s music production software can do so much for you that you don’t even need to know a thing about music. I appreciate the visual scripting and things like that, but it just seems to me like some of this could be made easier to understand than it is. I’m keeping at it. Here is what I did with cryengine after a couple of days:

[QUOTE=Coldkiller78;8489]
No, but today’s music production software can do so much for you that you don’t even need to know a thing about music. I appreciate the visual scripting and things like that, but it just seems to me like some of this could be made easier to understand than it is. I’m keeping at it. Here is what I did with cryengine after a couple of days:CryEngine 3 Survival Horror Game Test - YouTube

I haven’t used CryEngine myself, I’ve booted it up and that was about it. I will say, however, that I’ve played around with other game engines and there’s no denying the complexity of Unreal Engine compared to others. Epic has moved in the right direction, with UE4, to try and make things much more transparent and take away some of the obfuscation of the engine. By releasing the source code to all public parties, they’ve allowed us to dive deep into the engine components to view how things actually work. Material editing is much more “plaintext” now compared to UE3, and Kismet - now called Blueprint feels like it actually belongs in the engine, and is much easier to get a grasp on. UnrealScript has been thrown away, thank god. Epic has setup a Stack Overflow-like Q&A site called AnswerHub that is great for any specification questions that you have, and have released some great tutorial videos and demos to go along with the release of the engine.

One thing that shouldn’t be downplayed is that UE4 has only been released to the public for about a week now, most everyone is still learning all the bells and whistles that Epic has tucked away within the engine and getting used to it themselves. Community documentation/tutorials will come with time as the community discovers new things. If you look at UE3, you could probably find hundreds, if not thousands, of hours of tutorials created by the community over pretty much every subject.

What the complexity of UE4 is though, is overshadowed by the depth of control that you have over your project compared to other engines. No engine that I’ve seen comparatively gives you that much control, thus UE being more complex.

Epic could’ve done more though, we are in 2014 and there’s no standard materials/shaders for realistic water, realistic day/night cycle with real-time shadows and many other things that are lacking.
Those are crucial for indies and in CE they come out of the box.

Those things will be created over time, from Epic directly or otherwise.
They did just open up their the entire source code of their engine to the public :slight_smile: