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Today is a sad day. Today I returned to Unity.

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    Today is a sad day. Today I returned to Unity.

    I have been a Unity developer for several years, in the last year I started working with Unreal and it was like a dream. The results of my development were faster and better quality for my games, So why did I go back to Unity????
    Requirement of my clients for web development, Export to webgl. The export to webgl does not exist at all in the new versions, and in the old versions the export is not high quality at all, a small scene in Unity will take up about 10MB compared to a similar scene in Unreal that will take up over 100MB. And for webgl it's really important.
    I did not write this just to cry :-) I also want to ask if there is a chance that you will return the support to webgl and improve it? I find a lot of people very frustrated by this especially that the technology of the browsers and internet speeds Improving all the time. I and many others will be happy for a positive answer.

    #2
    Well, that's the result of removing support for OpenGL older than OpenGL ES 3.2 in Unreal.
    WebGL stopped at OpenGL ES 3.0 which doesn't support modern features...

    This means that Unreal's renderer moves forward in the direction of high-fidelity rendering. I'm afraid there's zero chance that WebGL would be back. Until.. a new web rendering API would emerge, based on something like Vulcan. Although even that wouldn't run on Mac, I guess. At least future versions of Unreal could work with something like that.

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      #3
      While it certainly works better than the Unreal support for WebGL it's still a pain to develop for in Unity as well.

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        #4
        i am in a similar boat, i am not developing for web, but I think build sizes in UE4 are generally on the heavier side unfortunately. I wish there would be more optimization done there, engine automatically excluding things that arent used etc. Unity was nice because of the small build sizes, so sharing around games and even projects was less heavy.

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          #5
          maordany Our team is creating support for 4.25 and 4.26 and above for WebGL, and we're trying to get a conversation going with Epic around support for WebGPU in the upcoming Unreal Engine 5 debut. Some of the issues we're trying to tackle with the WebGL pipeline are basic improvements which were not even looked at by Epic, such as smart asset loading, advanced compression, and a plug and play networking library. If you're interested in using our WebGL framework we're creating, you can join our Discord here: https://discord.gg/zUSZ3T8

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            #6
            Originally posted by MadPolygon View Post
            i am in a similar boat, i am not developing for web, but I think build sizes in UE4 are generally on the heavier side unfortunately. I wish there would be more optimization done there, engine automatically excluding things that arent used etc. Unity was nice because of the small build sizes, so sharing around games and even projects was less heavy.
            Originally I was thinking the same. But I noticed it's just not really possible since you can dynamically open resources during runtime, like for example with FObjectFinder - you can even access objects dynamically via calls from a server - which really makes sense in Multiplayer. So the engine "knowing" what is in use and what not is pretty much impossible. If you just use a single palyer game with no fancy or surprising calls to objetcs you can just take your current map and migrate it to a new blank project - then UE4 only takes stuff that is directly referenced during migration.

            I don't even wanna talk down Unity. It does a great job at building light weight executables. I know that's something you probably don't want to hear since it's loads of work - but UE4 is "open Source" - not by means of gpl, but by means that you get access to the source code and you can rewrite it or throw out things you don't like. Probably nothing someone making a small web or mobile game with a small team wants to do - you wanna focus on the game and take the engine "as is", understood. But once you start making your own fork and improve stuff in the engine that can make your workflow so much more efficient.

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