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Sharp decline in Official Responses from Epic throughout the community.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by BrUnO XaVIeR View Post
    ...indie devs and small studios are completely dependent on community. If UE4 community shrinks while Lumberyard's or Unity's increase, for indies using UE4 that becomes a major problem overtime. Epic is going be just fine, I'm much more worried about the community around Unreal Engine and new comers giving up because they receive 0% backup.
    Tim Sweeney recently reminded us all how important the Indie Community is:...
    Looking for that link I found this....... Probably not looking optimistic anymore...
    Last edited by UnrealEnterprise; 11-05-2017, 11:11 PM.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Zeblote View Post

    Are you saying unreal might not be around in a few years if this continues?
    No; but indie devs and small studios are completely dependent on community. If UE4 community shrinks while Lumberyard's or Unity's increase, for indies using UE4 that becomes a major problem overtime.

    Epic is going be just fine, I'm much more worried about the community around Unreal Engine and new comers giving up because they receive 0% backup.

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  • replied
    Putting my two cents here.

    My team and I feel the same way, but we haven't stuck around to ponder why and how and just moved to Unity for our game and things have been butter smooth so far.
    It just makes sense! We are busy developing rather than wondering!

    The thing is guys UE4 scares us, it really does, I don't know what to make of this engine, it's way too convoluted, you need a team of monster engineers just to get the basic troubleshooting off your back and keep the flood gates closed, there are waaay too many question marks for any indie team to invest time on something still very unstable and on shiftable grounds..

    Bottom line is this: If you don't have the solid backing with plenty of $$$ and lots of time to RnD with direct contact to Epic for support then good luck on betting on this horse.

    I hate to say it because i still go back to UE4 and work on personal prototypes/demos mostly because of the visual side, because it can take it.. but that's all i can feel that is goin for it at least from our experience. If unity ever catches up visually to UE's prowess then i don't believe i would find a reason to be here at all, and it seems those guys are working on something to do just that.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by muchcharles View Post
    They've released around 4 games on a 6 month or less cadence (Paragon, Roborecall, Fortnite, Fortnite: BR). 3/4 of them are "games as a service" which require major ongoing attention, especially in the initial launch period. My guess is they are just busy and have pulled resources to focus on first launching and then fighting fires on those games.

    Fortnite: BR has had 810,000 concurrent players, and has probably taken a huge effort to have rolled out as smooth as it has. They've said publicly UT4 people were pulled off of UT4 in creating it. Some of the engine community team may have be splitting time helping out with community stuff on those games (I haven't kept up with the forums for the games so don't know that for sure), etc.

    Fortnite: BR hasn't necessarily brought in a lot of new monetary resources yet, given that it hasn't been monetized. PUBG, as mentioned earlier, surely has brought in some major cash: $60,000,000 if all copies were sold at $30 and Bluehole paid 5% without a special negotiated rate (it's only ~$15 in China though, so that is a big overestimate). But even with an influx of money, bringing in the right people always has a large lead time. Hopefully they can increase staff rapidly and avoid causing employee burnout.

    All that activity is having lots of benefits to the stability/performance/battle-hardenedness of the engine. If your game uses a similar setup to any of their production games, things are now really getting solid without as many surprises as you would run into in the past.
    If that was the case, surely they could just say that instead of hiding and ignoring everyone?

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  • replied
    They've released around 4 games on a 6 month or less cadence (Paragon, Roborecall, Fortnite, Fortnite: BR). 3/4 of them are "games as a service" which require major ongoing attention, especially in the initial launch period. My guess is they are just busy and have pulled resources to focus on first launching and then fighting fires on those games.

    Fortnite: BR has had 810,000 concurrent players, and has probably taken a huge effort to have rolled out as smooth as it has. They've said publicly UT4 people were pulled off of UT4 in creating it. Some of the engine community team may have be splitting time helping out with community stuff on those games (I haven't kept up with the forums for the games so don't know that for sure), etc.

    Fortnite: BR hasn't necessarily brought in a lot of new monetary resources yet, given that it hasn't been monetized. PUBG, as mentioned earlier, surely has brought in some major cash: $60,000,000 if all copies were sold at $30 and Bluehole paid 5% without a special negotiated rate (it's only ~$15 in China though, so that is a big overestimate). But even with an influx of money, bringing in the right people always has a large lead time. Hopefully they can increase staff rapidly and avoid causing employee burnout.

    All that activity is having lots of benefits to the stability/performance/battle-hardenedness of the engine. If your game uses a similar setup to any of their production games, things are now really getting solid without as many surprises as you would run into in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    As someone who just recently started using UE and came here from Unity, I can just say that community and a good marketplace is key. You can have a better engine and all, but without a helpful community you won't get many new customers. Look at VR/AR - Unity got a huge share of the pie, just because of that - lots and lots of support, templates, projects.... that's a long time investment

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  • replied
    Originally posted by franktech View Post
    Discord effect???
    This is one thing that crossed my mind too, but Discord honestly amounts to little more than "how do I cast a BP!?" most of the time. For anything really advanced, there's no place to go anymore.

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  • replied
    its definently become very very difficult to get any response on answers unreal... and if there is a response its not usually a helpful one like in the past. I could be mistaken, but no one seems to really be trying to help lately... even when you give them a project with it reproducable they seem to want the steps to reproduce it... even though they can reproduce it on their end with that particular project... Its frustrating

    In fact contacting people directly in a private message on the forums doesnt even yield a response anymore... unless the forums are broken... thats pretty messed up...

    Seems liek one of the guys i used to go for questions or advice doesnt seem to work in that department anymore... Im having a hard time finding anyone to ask a question or advice too.. Posting on the forums or answers unreal seems pointless since no one really responds to that ever... Even though i continue to try constantly..... Cmon epic, do you want us to succeed ? Wheres the support at? New features are great, but half the time there broken. Hell i have a bug where merge actors makes 0 poly meshes if its not set to LOD 0 .. (auto lod by default..) Which also breaks HLOD ... so totally screws everything...

    And even though ive given a small project where its reproducable in taht project.... i cant get any support for it since i dont know the exact steps that this bug started... i just know that building the current levels hlods or merge actor creates 0 poly meshes... and theres no way around it..
    Last edited by kurylo3d; 11-05-2017, 06:58 AM.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Luos View Post
    for the last few months I do have this underbelly feel that something changed.
    Don't think your gut feeling is wrong.
    You can see a trend in the past year:

    1. Tim Sweeney posting on the forums has become a thing of the past / almost totally stopped.
    2. The Roadmap was shelved or at least morphed into something else, less recognizable etc.
    3. Alexander Paschall left, and the new community manager's focus is clearly somewhere else.
    4. It took a 'mini-petition' for Epic to re-see value in the Community Tools section of the forums.
    5. Far fewer posters, and massive fall off in quality posts by regular posters. Discord effect???
    6. Backlog of PR's / Unanswered AH posts as discussed above, and in lots of other posts etc.
    7. No official reply to this thread addressing the core points, despite calling Epic to the thread....
    Last edited by UnrealEnterprise; 11-04-2017, 09:54 PM.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Zeblote View Post

    Are you saying unreal might not be around in a few years if this continues?
    Unreal is far too big to disappear like that. The community though has taken a turn for the worse, quite rapidly.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by BrUnO XaVIeR View Post
    This is very serious; I've seen all this happen before ( Torque engine's community, CryEngine's, Unity's)...
    Users began to give up those communities and flow away to something else.
    Are you saying unreal might not be around in a few years if this continues?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I wont go into detail, but I feel the same way.
    I'm glad the marketplace team is picking up some slack, but I dunno.. for the last few months I do have this underbelly feel that something changed.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by iniside View Post

    To add to it, Unity seems to hiring quite a few of very high profile developers like Mike Acton. I my self evaluate Unity and Lumberyard.
    Yes; they also hired Natalya Tatarchuk.
    If lead says we have to use Unity next year I won't even have arguments anymore to say no like I did before, specifically because they know I've built gameplay frameworks, editor tools, and some mobile games on Unity.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by BrUnO XaVIeR View Post
    This is very serious; I've seen all this happen before ( Torque engine's community, CryEngine's, Unity's)...
    Users began to give up those communities and flow away to something else.

    4 years ago Unity pretty much had an exodus of users due to very familiar reasons discussed here. Turns out they had to almost triple their staff to "fix these issues".
    They fixed lack of communication, expanded documentation and training, prioritise user feedback, bug reports and even started to update that ancient slow mono in core of the engine and made some parts of the engine code open, plus, users can check roadmap and weekly engine changes now.
    ​​
    Results? It's working for them; people are slowly flowing back to Unity.
    (although they didn't fix the biggest issues: 1 - Unity doesn't develop games. 2 - Unity reputation is so bad if you have their logo attached to your game on Steam you lose sales because of it).

    Meanwhile, Epic took opposite path... Communication is lacking, documentation is a big mess, training is community driven, user feedback is ignored, bug reports are ignored for months, roadmap is gone, engine improvement is entirely guided by Epic's own internal game projects only.

    So, where do think all of this is going?
    I've been told by projects leads to evaluate and learn other engines already, such as Lumberyard, "-just in case".
    To add to it, Unity seems to hiring quite a few of very high profile developers like Mike Acton. I my self evaluate Unity and Lumberyard.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    This is very serious; I've seen all this happen before ( Torque engine's community, CryEngine's, Unity's)...
    Users began to give up those communities and flow away to something else.

    4 years ago Unity pretty much had an exodus of users due to very familiar reasons discussed here. Turns out they had to almost triple their staff to "fix these issues".
    They fixed lack of communication, expanded documentation and training, prioritise user feedback, bug reports and even started to update that ancient slow mono in core of the engine and made some parts of the engine code open, plus, users can check roadmap and weekly engine changes now.
    ​​
    Results? It's working for them; people are slowly flowing back to Unity.
    (although they didn't fix the biggest issues: 1 - Unity doesn't develop games. 2 - Unity reputation is so bad if you have their logo attached to your game on Steam you lose sales because of it).

    Meanwhile, Epic took opposite path... Communication is lacking, documentation is a big mess, training is community driven, user feedback is ignored, bug reports are ignored for months, roadmap is gone, engine improvement is entirely guided by Epic's own internal game projects only.

    So, where do think all of this is going?
    I've been told by projects leads to evaluate and learn other engines already, such as Lumberyard, "-just in case".

    Leave a comment:

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