Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Training Livestream - Getting Started with Gameplay Programming - July 27 - Live from Epic HQ

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • replied
    Originally posted by User-551616633 View Post
    Your live trainings have helped fill the C++ gap for me (dev with a Unity background).
    Great, glad to hear it!

    Originally posted by User-551616633 View Post
    The one place where there's still a massive gap...adding a network-ready custom character movement ability in C++...Please consider doing a live training on this as there is a massive documentation gap and there's high potential demand for it.
    That does sound like a good idea. I want to do streams to introduce the other two of the "3Cs" (character and controls), so this might be good to slip into the "character" one. However, this might also be good to do as an offline tutorial, either a written one or a video series. I can't promise when we'll get to this, but it is something I'd like to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Hi Richard,

    Your live trainings have helped fill the C++ gap for me (dev with a Unity background). The one place where there's still a massive gap, which I've struggled with for months, which remains after I've absorbed all the docs and tutorials available, and which is roadblocking me as a developer, is:

    adding a network-ready custom character movement ability in C++

    Please consider doing a live training on this as there is a massive documentation gap and there's high potential demand for it. It would give Unreal devs the ability to allow their characters to teleport, sprint, triple-jump, etc. in a networked environment. As it stands, developers only have 2 options: limit the characters in your multiplayer games to the movement abilities present in the Character class or inherit from the Pawn class and forego the anti-hack, movement prediction, etc. present in the Character class. There is this: https://wiki.unrealengine.com/Author...acter_Movement , but it's sorely lacking (I and other devs have struggled with it for months) and it's all that's available on this. This also cannot be done in Blueprints.
    Last edited by Nerdballer Games; 10-05-2017, 05:29 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Anansi- View Post
    Hi, Just wanted to say I really like this stream. I never realised the impact of the camera until now...
    Glad you liked it! Yes, camera is really important, and it's hard to notice when a camera is doing a good job. There's a term - "The Three Cs" - that is used to describe Camera, Character, and Controls. Those three things together describe most of how your game feels, in terms of interaction. This isn't to downplay audio, graphics, story, or any other aspect, but as a gameplay programmer, which Epic has described as "a designer who can code", 3C is the area where you'll have the strongest influence and impact, so it's critical to study. No promises, but I'm hoping to do another stream like this about Controls. Character might be a little too in-depth without art support, but I'm hopeful that we can do the Controls part.

    Originally posted by Anansi- View Post
    I don't now if it would be a lot af extra work. But as I just started using c++ I liked that this stream covers that. But I think it would be very usefull to have a blueprint version of this project for people who aren't ready too jump into c++.
    If you're starting on C++, you could check the C++ streams Lauren Ridge and I did a little while ago. There were two of them, and we covered a lot of early-learning stumbling blocks. I'd also say that the exercise of converting this C++ code to BP could actually be a good learning exercise, since you'll have to comb through it pretty thoroughly to make the conversion. Once you know it that well, you can probably make your own modifications. For example, one easy mod would be to use CurveFloat assets instead of typing in distance and speed-multiplier values in the camera speed limiter struct. Making little modifications like that is a great way to start learning how programming works. I may have said this before, but I learned C in 1995 when the Wolfenstein 3D source code was released, by studying and making small modifications to that game. Code was much smaller back then, but small projects like our templates, or like this camera code, can make a nice learning environment.

    The important thing is to keep working at it and challenging yourself. Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Hi, Just wanted to say I really like this stream. I never realised the impact of the camera until now...
    you mentioned a questionaire for feedback at the end of the stream. can you post the link in this thread as well?

    I don't now if it would be a lot af extra work. But as I just started using c++ I liked that this stream covers that. But I think it would be very usefull to have a blueprint version of this project for people who aren't ready too jump into c++. For this project since it is only one class I think it would be possible to have a blueprint version download...

    Since al the things discussed in the video stay true you would reach new commers as wel as more experienced people at the same time...

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Demoneyejin View Post
    A kinda camera I'd love to see it something akin to mega man or shadow complex. You have a camera that follows you but then you have rooms in which the camera becomes static (for bosses or challenges.) Also an interesting aspect of these cameras is not letting you proceed beyond the camera's viewport when the camera has hit a certain limit of a room.
    The code part of limiting a camera's movement to a "room" can be fairly simple, if the room is a convex hull. (Convex hulls are shapes where any two points inside the shape can be connected by a straight line that doesn't go outside the shape.) The interesting question about this is how your designers want to set up the boundaries that define the rooms, and how you harvest this data, or if you detect it dynamically. Some ways might include placing special Components or Actors that register themselves with the local GameState, or just placing special geometry above the map that the camera detects with collision tests. I'd love to get back to this, and maybe do a little more camera work in a future stream, but the code from this stream should help to get started, and then the concepts I've just described might put you a step forward. If you want to do distinct rooms, it might be a good idea to spawn a second camera in the new room (when moving from one room to another), configure it with anything that room requires (FOV settings or any other room-specific custom details) and then set that to be your view target, possibly with a blend time if you prefer a panning transition (like Super Metroid) to a jump-cut (like in Shadow Complex). You can delete the original camera when the transition is complete, or just save it so you can move it to a new room the next time you need to transition. I hope this gives you some ideas. But above all, as long as you're making sure each part of your game feels good, you're on a path to making an enjoyable experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Thank you all.

    I somehow logged in just in time to hear my question answered, what timing! XD

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Very good point [MENTION=147828]Oldsiren[/MENTION]. I remember when I first set up a camera switching system. I still can get some odd things to happen if I pushed buttons fast enough and in a particular order. I am sure there is a proper way to do it, but if you stray away from that you do seem to get some very strange things.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I want to know how to make a camera interpolate to being behind the player once they start running towards it. (Like the Batman Arkham games, after looking around with the camera, and it's left in some arbitrary position, sprinting towards the camera always forces the camera to interp back to being behind the player, loosely matching his rotation during sprint)

    Also, it's hilarious that you're a programmer with the last name "Bott". It's like a sculptor being named "chisel" XD
    Last edited by Aumaan Anubis; 07-27-2017, 03:16 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Could you show how to properly switch between two cameras that are in the same player, actor?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I'm new to the whole unreal engine regime, but im looking to develop my skills within the program to start developing gaming visuals for building designs i have created, as being an architect, creating your building as a game is going to be the future of presentation of your work. So one of my questions is prior to the live stream, but will this cover the coding to produce all the parameters for the camera positions and interation features you would normally see in a game? and my most important question is could you then save this code so that when i have a new building design i could load it into the new file and let it run without having to create all the code?

    Sorry for the long post peeps XD

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    I´m totally with [MENTION=30998]kenmorechalfant[/MENTION], since I made very similar experiences in my UE4 learning curve! ;-) And I would also very much enjoy more core gameplay classes streams! :-D Thx guys! You´re truly EPIC! Lookin´forward!

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by BhaaL View Post
    They usually go around an hour, perhaps a little more with Q&A. There will be VODs afterwards (both on Youtube and Twitch), so you can always go back and watch the ones you missed.
    Ok, thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    We definitely need more streams like this; teaching how the core gameplay classes work together.

    It took me quite awhile to understand just how cameras work in Unreal, and I'm still not even 100% on them. Particularly ViewTargets were a big headache at first. At first I thought they were the target you were viewing, and that's how it's described in some areas of the docs, but that made it sound like a point the camera is looking at, which confused me. What helped was thinking of it more as the thing that decides all the camera settings, not just a point to look at (rotation) but also position, FOV, etc. Also I don't think it's very well explained in the docs how when you set an actor/pawn as the ViewTarget it will try to see if it has a camera component and use that as the ViewTarget.. and how you can control the camera without even having a Camera Component, e.g. CalcCamera.... which I think is when it clicked for me that Camera Actors are really an abstraction to generate the right MinimalViewInfo.

    Also I still haven't understood why I would want to make a custom PlayerCameraManager; like, what you can put there vs pawn/controller.

    Another thing I'm foggy on, slightly related to cameras, is Control Rotation; as in some examples of how some games use it, when you might need it and when you don't.

    If you could explain that kind of stuff it would be very helpful.
    Last edited by kenmorechalfant; 07-25-2017, 12:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Nice, good fundamentals

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    They usually go around an hour, perhaps a little more with Q&A. There will be VODs afterwards (both on Youtube and Twitch), so you can always go back and watch the ones you missed.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X