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How to Improve Frame Rate Through Video Settings

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    #16
    Just off the top of my head could you try to get a picture or video with stat unit
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      #17
      Originally posted by GameplayBeforeGraphics View Post
      I am so frustrated because I am experiencing just around 10 frames per second. I have tried tweaking the settings and it hasn't helped at all. I am so incredibly disappointed because of the fact that I have a top of the line computer. I have an Alienware 17 with an i7-4710MQ @ 2.5 GHz AND 16GB of ram. I also have a AMD Radeon M9 M290X graphics with 4GB of GDDR5 running at 64bit. I really want to utilize Unreal Engine 4 now because it has just recently become free, but I simply can't because the frame rate is so poor. I have checked my computer settings and I am running on High Performance mode, not power-saving, I continually scan my computer for viruses/malware, optimize my operating system and disk drive, keep my registry clean and defragged, scan for any vulnerabilities, and ultimately try to keep my pc in tiptop shape. I am so frustrated because I have spent so much money on this computer and it has been great so far besides trying to load up Unreal Engine 4. Is there some way I can allocate more memory to Unreal Engine 4 which could possibly be the problem? I would like to get this problem solved because I firmly believe that my computer should be able to run Epic settings at optimal performance, yet it is running 10fps at the lowest settings. Thanks.
      Also what kind of scene are you running? Is it full or geometry and shaders with hundreds to thousands of instructions? Are you using a lot of post-processing?

      My 3-year-old laptop with integrated intel hd 4000 can run landscape demo around 30 fps with settings turned all the way down and third-person template at 55fps with settings all the way up.
      Procedural, modular, on-the-fly animation - iTween For UE4
      - Actors - Components - UMG - Ease In - Ease Out - Path-constrained Animation - $0

      Runtime Datatable
      -All the fun of DataTables dynamically loaded from text or Google Sheets while your game is running!

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        #18
        Hi,

        Thank you

        Maybe Build > Lighting Quality & Material Quality will Improve Frame Rate ?

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          #19
          Resolution is a big problem. Trying to render at full screen resolution will make almost any hardware suffer. I saw a legendary GTX 690/i7 Extreme Core build struggle to run the third person shooter demo at 30 FPS, 1440x2560. If you're running a high resolution desktop, you CANNOT run the viewport at a large size in full detail. My current PC is an i7 4770k (really good), NVIDIA GT 640 (average-low), 1080p monitor (very good), and I can get a 30+ FPS experience for the most part if I make the viewport a little smaller. If I upgrade to a GTX 970, I'm sure most of the issues with framerate will fall to the wayside. This engine is not getting any more difficult to render*, but luckily computers are becoming more and more capable of running it.

          *If you want to run dynamic GI, that will be another story. But out of the box, performance is actually a lot better.

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            #20
            I'm only running a GTX 660 and get 60fps in the TPS demo, and upwards of 40 in most things - Elemental, etc - at 1080. I think there was somethin' amiss with the machine you saw that on
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              #21
              Originally posted by JoeWintergreen View Post
              I'm only running a GTX 660 and get 60fps in the TPS demo, and upwards of 40 in most things - Elemental, etc - at 1080. I think there was somethin' amiss with the machine you saw that on
              My friend's desktop running a 5770 can run TPS at 60fps1080p. You're definitely right.
              Procedural, modular, on-the-fly animation - iTween For UE4
              - Actors - Components - UMG - Ease In - Ease Out - Path-constrained Animation - $0

              Runtime Datatable
              -All the fun of DataTables dynamically loaded from text or Google Sheets while your game is running!

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                #22
                I find that my game is GPU limited (got a GT630M) and get the best fps when I play as Standalone from editor.

                So I'm curious, as a PlayStation "fanboy", what would be comparable with PS3 quality, or PS4 quality?

                Those consoles got 60 fps games running at HD resolution, right?

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by GameplayBeforeGraphics View Post
                  I am so frustrated because I am experiencing just around 10 frames per second. I have tried tweaking the settings and it hasn't helped at all. I am so incredibly disappointed because of the fact that I have a top of the line computer. I have an Alienware 17 with an i7-4710MQ @ 2.5 GHz AND 16GB of ram. I also have a AMD Radeon M9 M290X graphics with 4GB of GDDR5 running at 64bit. I really want to utilize Unreal Engine 4 now because it has just recently become free, but I simply can't because the frame rate is so poor. I have checked my computer settings and I am running on High Performance mode, not power-saving, I continually scan my computer for viruses/malware, optimize my operating system and disk drive, keep my registry clean and defragged, scan for any vulnerabilities, and ultimately try to keep my pc in tiptop shape. I am so frustrated because I have spent so much money on this computer and it has been great so far besides trying to load up Unreal Engine 4. Is there some way I can allocate more memory to Unreal Engine 4 which could possibly be the problem? I would like to get this problem solved because I firmly believe that my computer should be able to run Epic settings at optimal performance, yet it is running 10fps at the lowest settings. Thanks.
                  Have you tried to make sure the AMD Radeon is activated with UE4?
                  I never used AMD, but on NVIDIA drivers there was a use "High Performance Nvidia processor" in global settings, and not the integrated Intel HD one.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Atle View Post
                    Have you tried to make sure the AMD Radeon is activated with UE4?
                    I never used AMD, but on NVIDIA drivers there was a use "High Performance Nvidia processor" in global settings, and not the integrated Intel HD one.
                    I found out that you can look in Saved\Logs & search for FSynthBenchmark and it will say the name of the GPU

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Michael3DX View Post
                      I find that my game is GPU limited (got a GT630M) and get the best fps when I play as Standalone from editor.

                      So I'm curious, as a PlayStation "fanboy", what would be comparable with PS3 quality, or PS4 quality?

                      Those consoles got 60 fps games running at HD resolution, right?
                      PS3 games were largely 30fps at 720p upscaled, though some were native.

                      PS4 games are mostly 1080p, though some are less. While many games run at 60fps, 30 is still the norm.

                      Any GPU from the last five years outperforms PS3. PS4 even is quite modest in power, so most mid-to-high range GPUs would best it.
                      Procedural, modular, on-the-fly animation - iTween For UE4
                      - Actors - Components - UMG - Ease In - Ease Out - Path-constrained Animation - $0

                      Runtime Datatable
                      -All the fun of DataTables dynamically loaded from text or Google Sheets while your game is running!

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Jared Therriault View Post
                        PS3 games were largely 30fps at 720p upscaled, though some were native.

                        PS4 games are mostly 1080p, though some are less. While many games run at 60fps, 30 is still the norm.

                        Any GPU from the last five years outperforms PS3. PS4 even is quite modest in power, so most mid-to-high range GPUs would best it.
                        Thanks for that info Jared Therriault!

                        I have seen that Ninja Gaiden on PS3 was at 60 fps @ 720p, and DmC is 60 fps @ 1080p on PS4. But maybe those games uses some kind of dark-magic API for the GPU that is using optimizations not possible on PC?

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                          #27
                          So I'm curious, as a PlayStation "fanboy", what would be comparable with PS3 quality, or PS4 quality?
                          PS3? Pretty much any integrated graphics card with a powerful Intel i7 CPU. Weird setup, but that's the closest you can get to Cell's ridiculously overpowered, ridiculously paralleled CPU architecture. Most integrated graphics cards will exceed the 4.4 Gp/s fillrate for pixel shading, and you will not find a computer nowadays that offers less than 256 MB of RAM. I think some of the higher-end integrated graphics cards are better than Xbox One quality. 25.6 Gp/s fillrate is what you need to surpass the PS4's pixel shading performance. A GTX 560 ti will easily outdo it, and most likely the GTX 950 as well. 8GB of RAM is not hard to find. The PS4's CPU however is a lot different than the Cell: a very slow 1.6 Ghz i7 (don't think that exists) with boost capabilities comes close to replicating it.

                          Be careful when you say "this game runs 1080p 60 FPS on the PS3, it should run like that in UE4," because UE4 uses an entirely different lighting system that's a lot more difficult to process. It's based on reflections instead of a basic direction to a colored light source. If you don't have the power to provide reflections for the map, you won't be able to light it as quickly. So, just a good comparison to make, Super Smash Bros. 4 runs on the Wii U in 1080p 60 FPS but with outdated phong shading, and Mario Kart 8 runs 720p 60 FPS with UE4-like physically based rendering, and absolutely no screen space reflections (I think MK8's kart/character reflections are pulled from a scene capture that updates once every 65 frames, while the environment uses a generic one-size-fits-all ambient reflection). Both of those games run without anti aliasing, or any of UE4's advanced post processing effects.

                          UE3's Phong shading:

                          UE4's physically based rendering:

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                            #28
                            I was confused and felt like that my old PS3 outperforms my test/demo running on my laptop (i7 & GT630M) that did cost twice as much. But now I understand that UE4 uses completely different shading & post effects.

                            Thanks for the clarification!

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Michael3DX View Post
                              Thanks for that info Jared Therriault!

                              I have seen that Ninja Gaiden on PS3 was at 60 fps @ 720p, and DmC is 60 fps @ 1080p on PS4. But maybe those games uses some kind of dark-magic API for the GPU that is using optimizations not possible on PC?
                              Some games definitely were able to get great performance that other games did not, but it depends on a lot of factors - post-processing, lighting accuracy, number of objects, number of lights, number of vertices, vertex deformations, shader instructions, physics, and game code. Ninja Gaiden Sigma was an original Xbox game before it went to PS3, so aside from the extra specular effects, more voluminous particle effects and increase in resolutions, it wasn't very hard on the PS3. DmC was 30fps last gen, so 60 this gen is to be expected

                              As mariomguy said, previous generations tended toward Phong shading that could "fake" a physical look with the right settings, but most modern engines use PBR now. It looks much more physically accurate without the need for the artist to fake anything, but that comes at a cost. But this in turn decreases development costs, so there's greater advantage to using PBR in some areas.
                              Procedural, modular, on-the-fly animation - iTween For UE4
                              - Actors - Components - UMG - Ease In - Ease Out - Path-constrained Animation - $0

                              Runtime Datatable
                              -All the fun of DataTables dynamically loaded from text or Google Sheets while your game is running!

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                                #30
                                Yeah, if you want to make a game run fast in UE4, you'll have to make some adjustments: instead of using dynamic or stationary lights, use static lighting for everything. You can have some generic lighting for everything in the game instead of specific specular reflections. If you set the max roughness for screenspace reflections all the way down to 0, then nothing will have screen space reflections and it will all either update from the reflection environment or a generic ambient cubemap. Don't use too many heavy post process effects: that costs more. Don't use too many objects or polygons. And run your game at a sub-HD resolution using the screen percentage in Misc post process settings. If you do all this, I guarantee you UE4 will run fast, fast enough to look great on mobile. But you'll also be missing a lot of nifty features that makes UE4 so prized as an artist's engine.

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