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How to make this scene more realistc?

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    How to make this scene more realistc?

    Hi,

    I'm trying to make this office scene as realistic as possible, here is the latest render I've made using a high lighting bake. I currently use spotlights for the hanging lights in the scene, and a skylight with a directional light for the outside. Below is the latest screenshot and the settings for my scene:

    Latest render:


    World Lightmass Settings:


    Skylight Settings:


    Directional Light Settings:


    Any tips to improve this?
    Last edited by Slaze; 07-13-2020, 06:51 AM.

    #2
    Originally posted by Slaze View Post
    Hi,

    I'm trying to make this office scene as realistic as possible, here is the latest render I've made using a high lighting bake. I currently use spotlights for the hanging lights in the scene, and a skylight with a directional light for the outside. Below is the latest screenshot and the settings for my scene:

    Latest render:


    World Lightmass Settings:


    Skylight Settings:


    Directional Light Settings:


    Any tips to improve this?
    You could increase the lightmap resolution of the floor for starters
    Check out Zof ( puzzle game ) on Steam:

    https://store.steampowered.com/app/1414480/Zof/

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by ClockworkOcean View Post

      You could increase the lightmap resolution of the floor for starters
      Oh yes, it's always the most simple thing I forget haha! What would you recommend? I've upped it to 512 currently and it's increased my baking time a tonne, which is fine, but was wondering if that's to high/low?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Slaze View Post

        Oh yes, it's always the most simple thing I forget haha! What would you recommend? I've upped it to 512 currently and it's increased my baking time a tonne, which is fine, but was wondering if that's to high/low?
        Two main things to consider are:

        1) lightmap resolution view ( is it green? )

        2) What it looks like. How far you have to go depends on the size of the mesh, amoung other things.
        Check out Zof ( puzzle game ) on Steam:

        https://store.steampowered.com/app/1414480/Zof/

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by ClockworkOcean View Post

          Two main things to consider are:

          1) lightmap resolution view ( is it green? )

          2) What it looks like. How far you have to go depends on the size of the mesh, amoung other things.
          Ah okay, yeah it's green, I'm also now making everything else in the scene green and see how that looks

          Comment


            #6
            I've re-baked the light, only on preview this time and this is how it comes out. Looks so much nicer now the lightmaps are sorted.

            Comment


              #7
              In World Lightmass Settings, try increasing Occlusion Exponent to 2 or 3, and increasing Max Occlusion Distance to 300 or 400. It appears that the sunlight is entering at a low angle (as though it's morning or evening), based on the shadows, at least. Softening the shadows would help it display more realism. So, increasing Source Angle or Light Source Angle (Lightmass) could get the effect of shadows being softer as they're further from the caster object. Try enabling "Affect Translucent Lighting" in the skylight, and directional light if it's off, since there's a number of windows and what appears to be a glass wall/door for an office room.

              Comment


                #8
                Hi!

                Preview will never give you nice results, I'd recommend to bake it on at least Medium.
                512 lightmap resolution for a floor in an archviz scene is pretty low... If the whole floor is just 1 mesh then you won't be able to assign a high enough lightmap resolution! You should break it up into smaller parts... The calculation will be faster too!
                You have 4 for lighting smoothness which will produce an over blurred result: you'll lose ALL detailed lighting information! Try it with 0.6!
                Also you have compression on which generates artifacts! Turn it off!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by presto423 View Post
                  In World Lightmass Settings, try increasing Occlusion Exponent to 2 or 3, and increasing Max Occlusion Distance to 300 or 400. It appears that the sunlight is entering at a low angle (as though it's morning or evening), based on the shadows, at least. Softening the shadows would help it display more realism. So, increasing Source Angle or Light Source Angle (Lightmass) could get the effect of shadows being softer as they're further from the caster object. Try enabling "Affect Translucent Lighting" in the skylight, and directional light if it's off, since there's a number of windows and what appears to be a glass wall/door for an office room.
                  Originally posted by Makigirl View Post
                  Hi!

                  Preview will never give you nice results, I'd recommend to bake it on at least Medium.
                  512 lightmap resolution for a floor in an archviz scene is pretty low... If the whole floor is just 1 mesh then you won't be able to assign a high enough lightmap resolution! You should break it up into smaller parts... The calculation will be faster too!
                  You have 4 for lighting smoothness which will produce an over blurred result: you'll lose ALL detailed lighting information! Try it with 0.6!
                  Also you have compression on which generates artifacts! Turn it off!
                  Hi guys, thank you so much for the tips. I've done both of these and this is the outcome so far. Love how it's looking!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    It's looking somewhat better, more of an ambient atmosphere how an office looks. But it is kinda dark. The shadows of objects look way better. One thing I notice is a few of the shadows on the ceiling are extending rather far. It doesn't look unrealistic, but not sure if it's what is preferred for that particular office scene. I don't know the final result / goal, so I'm not sure whether it's accurate for the intended result. The AO setting, Min Occlusion (Skylight), can lighten things a bit by increasing it (but not much of an increase, as it seems it is sensitive). Try 0.1 to 0.5 to start. If it's too much, reduce it, and if it's not enough brightening, then increase it by 0.05 per try.

                    Another one, which is called Ray Start Offset Depth Scale, is found in the directional light and in point / spot lights. Increase it a little bit (like from 0.003 the default to at the most 0.01 I think), and it'll move the shadowing further into the geometry so it's not so heavy / profuse inside cracks / crevices / corners (like the shelf by the wall, left side of photo...or the ventilation shaft at top right). It depends on how the final result is intended to display.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by presto423 View Post
                      It's looking somewhat better, more of an ambient atmosphere how an office looks. But it is kinda dark. The shadows of objects look way better. One thing I notice is a few of the shadows on the ceiling are extending rather far. It doesn't look unrealistic, but not sure if it's what is preferred for that particular office scene. I don't know the final result / goal, so I'm not sure whether it's accurate for the intended result. The AO setting, Min Occlusion (Skylight), can lighten things a bit by increasing it (but not much of an increase, as it seems it is sensitive). Try 0.1 to 0.5 to start. If it's too much, reduce it, and if it's not enough brightening, then increase it by 0.05 per try.

                      Another one, which is called Ray Start Offset Depth Scale, is found in the directional light and in point / spot lights. Increase it a little bit (like from 0.003 the default to at the most 0.01 I think), and it'll move the shadowing further into the geometry so it's not so heavy / profuse inside cracks / crevices / corners (like the shelf by the wall, left side of photo...or the ventilation shaft at top right). It depends on how the final result is intended to display.
                      thank you for the reply. Yeah I was looking to make it more bright, but was just going to increase the intensity of each light gradually till I found what I like, but I’ll try what you said and display the results tomorrow

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Easiest/best way to brighten up a scene is through postprocess! If you just make lights stronger you might end up burning the lit/bright parts...
                        Also maybe your materials are too dark: try to make them brighter in the editor!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          -Increase the amount of ambient light coming in. Currently it looks weird.
                          you'll want clear defined contrast between the areas lit from outside and then lit by the indoor lights.
                          -Kill the white chairs. Anything is better than white chairs.
                          White chairs scream 'Look at meeee'. Never ever look at white chairs. It causes permanent brain damage.
                          -You have a empty ceiling the size of an olympic swimming pool. Empty space like that is ****. Put some stuff on it to make it more interesting.
                          -Work with more defined roughness on your surfaces. Reflections are key. The real world has a multitude of reflective shades. Even stuff that doesn't look like it's reflective, often reflects at least something.
                          Just think of Karate-Kid...Reflect ON, Reflect OFF and make this your mantra as you Zen through your office and scrutinize everything like a little ducky looking for water

                          https://www.artstation.com/chesire

                          Comment


                            #14
                            also increase the soft light radius on your lights, to get softer shadows in the distance

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks for the help guys, this is where I'm at.



                              I think the AO has given it quite a blue tint to it. I have my Min Occulusion on 0.1, my Occlusion Contrast on 0.2.

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