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    That's ahead of my expectations, well done.

    Originally posted by TommyBear View Post
    Would love to see some sweet RT'ed caustics.
    If processor speeds keep doublingish every 18 months you won't see real-time path traced caustics for a decade if not longer. Someone may figure out a nifty trick to fake it though.
    Last edited by Antidamage; 02-20-2019, 02:39 PM.

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      Originally posted by Tim Hobson View Post

      Ray Tracing and Path Tracing features will ship as "Early Access" for 4.22.

      Early Access for UE4 is defined as such:


      Experimental for UE4 is defined as such:


      The RT Devs are tirelessly working to have some really cool things out the door at the launch of 4.22 for everyone. Improvements are being made rapidly in our 4.22 branch and not directly in our Dev-Rendering stream. Once the cutoff for 4.22 is made and features are stabilized, those changes will be merged back down to our Main branch and then down to the Dev-Rendering branch soon enough.

      RT won't have every feature at launch, like Landscape support, which has been mentioned a number of times here, but it'll have a lot for everyone to check out. I'm not sure how long it will stay Early Access, but over the next release or two, there will be additional features coming online for sure!
      any information about path tracer will be integrated to sequencer? with sample settings etc also denoiser ofc just like renderers in DCC apps. Would be super cool; native offline renderer in Unreal! :O

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        Originally posted by alperenozgur View Post

        any information about path tracer will be integrated to sequencer? with sample settings etc also denoiser ofc just like renderers in DCC apps. Would be super cool; native offline renderer in Unreal! :O
        You could jack up the samples and bounces for offline renders. Other than that I doubt any extra integration is needed, people have already demoed it working.

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          Originally posted by Antidamage View Post
          That's ahead of my expectations, well done.



          If processor speeds keep doublingish every 18 months you won't see real-time path traced caustics for a decade if not longer. Someone may figure out a nifty trick to fake it though.
          Not sure where you getting a decade from, but we just need the ray-traced translucency to work correctly and function with GI, and we will get natural caustics. It is already being done in RTX demos.

          Just to show you, here is atomic heart, it traces caustics from a light source (believe this is also a UE4 project):
          https://youtu.be/q5e-GVEqL9A

          Tommy.
          Last edited by TommyBear; 02-20-2019, 04:25 PM.

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            Those caustics are fake, you can see artifacts and they're still there when RTX is switched off Nvidia has shown ray-traced caustics though:

            ArtStation

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              Very niiiice!

              EDIT: Also had the realization that I had mis-read r.raytracing.translucency,maxrefractionrays as r.raytracing.translucency,maxrefractionbounces... whoops! Looks excellent now.
              Last edited by TommyBear; 02-20-2019, 06:10 PM.

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                Originally posted by TommyBear View Post

                Not sure where you getting a decade from, but we just need the ray-traced translucency to work correctly and function with GI, and we will get natural caustics. It is already being done in RTX demos.

                Just to show you, here is atomic heart, it traces caustics from a light source (believe this is also a UE4 project):
                https://youtu.be/q5e-GVEqL9A

                Tommy.
                There's a lot of "and that just happens" in that video. It's not like that in reality, there's a lot of optimization behind every task building the scene, it's not just a single ray simulation to get the entire result.

                Those caustics don't look real, they're not actually path traced. I'd say it's a projected light function given how it looks the same at all surface distances. The real test is to get the correct interference pattern being cast through a solid piece of transmissive material like a vase:



                So for something like water where you fully don't care if a bit of light actually came from a particular angled surface you could probably do an even better job with a gerstner wave function that takes into account surface distance to adjust the focal depth of the projection. Heck you could sync your water to it. That's what I mean by faking it good. That's not what's happening in the video, but I'm sure it's coming. But that won't get you the rendered scene above.

                Having worked with path tracing and real caustics before I can promise that it's the most resource intensive operation you can undertake. Even with four Titan X cards it took me a couple of days to render caustics into lightmass for a tiny scene like the one above using GPU accelerated path tracing. When we get that level of computation in real-time we'll be making near perfect simulations.
                Last edited by Antidamage; 02-20-2019, 08:41 PM.

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                  Originally posted by The_Distiller View Post
                  Those caustics are fake, you can see artifacts and they're still there when RTX is switched off Nvidia has shown ray-traced caustics though:
                  It's nice but it still looks like someone wrote a caustic projection light function into the ray shader of the glass material. I think that's the right way to do it for this gen, but to really get a nice feeling caustic it's going to have to spawn dozens of rays rather than one or two.

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                    Originally posted by Antidamage View Post

                    You could jack up the samples and bounces for offline renders. Other than that I doubt any extra integration is needed, people have already demoed it working.
                    i said "PATH TRACER", read more carefuly. Integration is needed for what i meant. You can't use it with sequencer right now.

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                      The only path tracing in UE will be the GI technique I think. Are you asking them to implement an entirely new process just for sequencer renders? You can export your scene animation frame by frame and render it in one of the commercial path tracers more effectively.

                      I was working on a third party pathtracing integration for UE but I don't know what's happened to that since I left.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Antidamage View Post
                        The only path tracing in UE will be the GI technique I think. Are you asking them to implement an entirely new process just for sequencer renders? You can export your scene animation frame by frame and render it in one of the commercial path tracers more effectively.

                        I was working on a third party pathtracing integration for UE but I don't know what's happened to that since I left.
                        you have no idea what im talking about.. there is TWO new modes. one is ray tracing other is path tracing. look at release notes of 4.22 preview please.

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                          • Unbiased, full GI path tracer for making ground truth reference renders inside UE4.
                          Aha, I see what you're talking about. It's for reference renders. Give it a go and see what kind of results you can get out of it. Once it's denoised it might be good as a reference for your scenes, but it might not be fast enough to use for cinematics (nobody would be happier than me if it turned out to be better than the competition though). In most cases path tracing takes a lot longer to get the same visual quality as hybrid solutions, even though it ends up being more realistic and accurate.

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by Antidamage View Post

                            Aha, I see what you're talking about. It's for reference renders. Give it a go and see what kind of results you can get out of it. Once it's denoised it might be good as a reference for your scenes, but it might not be fast enough to use for cinematics (nobody would be happier than me if it turned out to be better than the competition though). In most cases path tracing takes a lot longer to get the same visual quality as hybrid solutions, even though it ends up being more realistic and accurate.
                            Im really not into game making. we using unrel for Viz, So im ok even with 0.1 fps hehe. Because i dont need real-time cinematics. Just exporting frame by frame. It would just good to have something like Octane in unreal. That's all.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Antidamage View Post

                              There's a lot of "and that just happens" in that video. It's not like that in reality, there's a lot of optimization behind every task building the scene, it's not just a single ray simulation to get the entire result.

                              Those caustics don't look real, they're not actually path traced. I'd say it's a projected light function given how it looks the same at all surface distances. The real test is to get the correct interference pattern being cast through a solid piece of transmissive material like a vase:



                              So for something like water where you fully don't care if a bit of light actually came from a particular angled surface you could probably do an even better job with a gerstner wave function that takes into account surface distance to adjust the focal depth of the projection. Heck you could sync your water to it. That's what I mean by faking it good. That's not what's happening in the video, but I'm sure it's coming. But that won't get you the rendered scene above.

                              Having worked with path tracing and real caustics before I can promise that it's the most resource intensive operation you can undertake. Even with four Titan X cards it took me a couple of days to render caustics into lightmass for a tiny scene like the one above using GPU accelerated path tracing. When we get that level of computation in real-time we'll be making near perfect simulations.
                              Again, caustics are not some kind of special functionality. They are a product of:

                              - Translucent tracing (with GI and refraction/reflection support)
                              - Supportive geometry modeled correctly

                              That's it! As far as light-mass is concerned in your case, its speed is highly settings dependent (not just scene size) and not a good measure of unbiased monte-carlo tracing. Check out: https://erichlof.github.io/THREE.js-...thTracing.html

                              This path tracer is implemented in webgl, runs on a standard GPU and will render a full GI'ed scene in less than a minute. It's also run-time interactive. There are other demos on that site too, they are worth a look.

                              Having built a bunch of path tracers from scratch, CPU and GPU, using both compute and raster, I am pretty confident we will see a GI only mode of RT in use within 1-2 years. Where we exclude direct lighting from other passes like skylight/emissive, point, rect and spot light and instead inject directly into the GI by default.

                              Tommy.

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                                This one is really cool actually: https://erichlof.github.io/THREE.js-..._Showcase.html

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