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    Trees and anti-aliasing problem

    Hi! I was experimenting with trees and I found something interesting. When I switch anti-aliasing method to MSAA I got result wchich I wanted from beginning but performance is low. Is there anything that I can do to get result similar to MSAA on other AA?
    http://i.imgur.com/g634p58.jpg
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    #2
    Originally posted by FIX142 View Post
    Hi! I was experimenting with trees and I found something interesting. When I switch anti-aliasing method to MSAA I got result wchich I wanted from beginning but performance is low. Is there anything that I can do to get result similar to MSAA on other AA?
    http://i.imgur.com/g634p58.jpg
    Maybe try running at higher resolution scale (like between 100 and 200 percent) and having FXAA. It should be less taxing than MSAA.
    Last edited by tapirtoon; 02-19-2019, 06:29 PM.

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      #3
      Originally posted by FIX142 View Post
      Hi! I was experimenting with trees and I found something interesting. When I switch anti-aliasing method to MSAA I got result wchich I wanted from beginning but performance is low. Is there anything that I can do to get result similar to MSAA on other AA?
      http://i.imgur.com/g634p58.jpg
      Oh wait, I just found out a way to improve the performance.

      "To get a result closer to the deferred renderer, you can make your OpacityMask input into a steeper gradient. For example if you have an OpacityMaskClipValue of .33, you can do a Mul with 5 and then Subtract (.33 * 5). This will make the OpacityMask gradient steeper, pushing the translucent bands closer together, but keeping the value .33 in the same spot."

      https://answers.unrealengine.com/que...e-problem.html


      This makes the leaves thicker with MSAA and improves performance by a lot. But keep in mind the opacity mask value doesn't have to be multiplied by 5, it can (and should) be multiplied by a higher number. This keeps the density of the leaves from fading with distance. MSAA is still 10 to 20 percent slower than FXAA (depending on the scene).

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