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  • replied
    Originally posted by DavidWilliams777 View Post
    Where can I find the latest source code? Can you direct me to the link. thanks!
    Create an account on https://www.unrealengine.com, link it with your GitHub account, and then you can download the latest UE4 source code from https://github.com/EpicGames/UnrealEngine.
    Last edited by gmpreussner; 03-23-2015, 11:29 AM. Reason: removed duplicate quote

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  • replied
    Where can I find the latest source code? Can you direct me to the link. thanks!

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  • replied
    I would be definitely interested to see UE1 sources! It would be interesting to compare them to UE4 sources, to see how it's all started. Perhaps, there are still some lines of code that didn't change significantly since UE1 :P

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  • replied
    Epic Unreal Dev Grants for UE4. Interesting..trust Unreal community..it is good idea...but not for me. I believe than I will make game on UE1..game for players not for money..

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  • replied
    Source is about new Openfreegame...no about new code for UT,Unreal 1,Whell of time (is active Mark Poesh yet?)..
    OpenSource will be clean version 533 or 613 with DX7,OpenGL..
    UE1 is about simlicity..(minimum actors,scripts,properties - ver.200 Unreal 1 rulez)..(but basic function: Pawn from Unreal 1,dynamic shadow, decal, static mesh)
    UE1 will be as demoscene on Unreal engine and engine general (veryfast compile, easy build, fast modeling, less megabytes).
    Nothing adjustments or extensions.
    Important is modeling and gameplay....
    Last edited by Akyra; 02-09-2015, 03:18 PM.

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  • replied
    As somebody just getting into graphics programming, the idea is nice and I hope a UE1 source release occurs. A potential effect of any source release of an engine is the learning opportunities they bring for younger system programmers. While that part of the industry may enjoy being less competitive than others for better or worse, enthusiasts inadvertently take initiative when they occupy themselves with their technical hobbies, and those are kinds of people you want working in your industry as technology and demands continue to evolve. Not that I'm trying to convince anyone here; we all seem fairly enthusiastic for a release of the engine source. But it's a productive example I wanted to highlight.

    Originally posted by Torax
    The creator of Unreal 227 patch, Smirftsch from OldUnreal, already have the source code.
    Why just not to give him permission to enable public access to libraries?
    Smirftsch's goal with the engine has been to expand the functionality of the original Unreal/UGold games' engine. It's a similar goal to the one many have voiced in this thread, but not directly related to actually releasing the source. Of course he has some form of the engine's source code, but working with Epic to distribute the code is not his responsibility if Epic themselves decide to push a release. They also have an opportunity to tailor and clean up the code to their liking, and update what's there at a later date if it occurs to them to do so.

    For a proper release, it's likely that Epic would want to use a repository for people to clone and fork, like with UE4. This is generally the proper way to manage digital projects and source code distribution, and Epic would be the primary party responsible for doing so.

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  • replied
    The creator of Unreal 227 patch, Smirftsch from OldUnreal, already have the source code.
    Why just not to give him permission to enable public access to libraries?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by XenoBrain View Post
    Cleaning and porting old source code to new compilers is exactly what the open source community specializes in. Just dump the most complete source tree you've got for UE1 and someone will have it up running in just a few days, and that's a *conservative* estimate.
    Seriously. I'm a former C/x86 asm programmer who's now in management in a totally non-tech related industry. It's been a couple of years since I've tackled a big project, but if the UE1 source was released, I would jump right into it.

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  • replied
    UE1 is Tim heart issue. Perhaps source UE1 takes a lot of time. The entire code programmed alone and worked on it from morning to evening many years. But I think it's time for the release.

    UE3 and UE2 was built to UE1, lots of people do not understand why Quake 1,2,3 was issued a UE1 not. Time advantage Epic is great that Epic Open source UE1 can not compromise Epic...

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  • replied
    Hey Tim. I'm not assuming this kind of thing to be official in terms of Epic's official stance as a whole yet (I'll get to why in a moment), but if this is true then I'm very interested to see where a source release could be taken. Tech-wise the engine is not brand new or frankly marketable in the triple-A space, but it's still no slouch of an engine, let alone a platform for experimentation and expansion, and even marketability for independent developers. The amount of interest it would likely garner is, conservatively speaking, small. But even that would be worth it to those hobbyists who pick it up and want to do something with it, let alone the potential it has for more serious individuals/institutions who want to do more than just tinker.

    My biggest concern is not the cleaning, organization, and repackaging of the source code (all practical limitations that rely on the attention that the task could receive given time), but in terms of the legal/licensing situation there at Epic and of the much more influential but vexing bureaucracy that ultimately guards that decision. If there's a chance that the source could be organized and released from a purely manual perspective, the process to make it legal and valid would still override this in a case where a release of the code is denied in the first place. I'm interested to know if these are even issues that would need to be addressed, and how they would be addressed given their relevance. Thanks!
    Last edited by Jet v4.3.5; 12-31-2014, 04:28 PM.

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  • replied
    I have it...first version Unreal Engine 2 begun when had first support Directx 8..it really version 633 (spring 2001)..?

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  • replied
    Next good news, Visual Studio 6 will be best for source.

    Mystery is description on wiki.beyondunreal about Unreal engine 1 version. Is true, that last version Unreal engine 1.5 was version 613..? It was officially for to licensees..? What was border for new version (2). Before version 777 was class TEXTURE, MATERIAL wasnt, but was already controller (uff) and button placeable classes only in editor. 633 and 739 were similar like 533 version. I think realy beginning version 2 was 777..?.. (or maybe was be beginning version 2 partership with Nvidia in 9/2000....)

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  • replied
    Originally posted by Akyra View Post
    I hope, that source will be not in visual studio .NET 2002 or 2003. The best is 6.0 or 2005 and high...
    Of course, Visual Studio 6 was the best version. It's been downhill since 1998!

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  • replied
    Cleaning and porting old source code to new compilers is exactly what the open source community specializes in. Just dump the most complete source tree you've got for UE1 and someone will have it up running in just a few days, and that's a *conservative* estimate.

    Getting it under the same license as UE4 is a logical move, but it would be very interesting to see it under a more permissive license like MIT. I'll bet Unreal 1 and UT 1 would get a lot of love above and beyond OldUnreal's 227 patch, and probably show up on every platform imaginable (Android, Raspberry Pi). Personally I'd set up a UT on Raspberry Pi LAN party at me local computer club. It would be fascinating to see the results of truly letting the code loose, but even if it doesn't got that far releasing under the UE4 license would still pay dividends.

    In short--no need to get it releasable, fixing up old codebases is a special kind of fun for many of us.

    Edit: Not to get too beggary but it would be fantastic if the code drop could include (possibly multiple versions) of Unreal 1's /doc/TimNotes.txt it's fascinating look at Unreal's development history with tons of great ideas that someone today just might be inspired to implement.
    Last edited by XenoBrain; 11-24-2014, 06:00 PM.

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  • replied
    I hope, that source will be not in visual studio .NET 2002 or 2003. The best is 6.0 or 2005 and high...

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