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    Sharing Editor binaries with a team

    Hello everyone ! first, thanks for reading.

    Me and my small team (4) have been struggling for the past week and a half at sharing the editor and our project in the smartest way possible - ideally by using perforce.

    As you can imagine, and the reason while I'm here, we're struggling. We've tried to follow the unreal documentation and to submit our editor to perforce, but we've not been able to sync it back and have it work. For the time being we are sharing the editor by copying it manually from a shared drive.

    Could anyone recommend a clear tutorial or a clear workflow that explains everything in detail on how share editor binaries with a team through a source control service ?

    We are also having issues with our project. If we submit the project and anyone gets the latest version, he will have to recompile the project - is this normal with a c++ project ? Is there a way for our two data people to not have to build the project ?

    Thank you for your time !

    Jesse

    #2
    https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-US/...ild/index.html
    https://www.casualdistractiongames.com

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      #3
      Thank you OptimisticMonkey ! This is definitely interesting and I will try it out today - I still don't know how to put the editor sources on perforce, but this is a clear way to share editor binairies.

      On Windows, add a registry key to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Epic Games\UnrealEngine\Builds that uses your identifier as its key, and the path to the Engine as its value. For example, the Key might be MyCustom419 , and the value might be D:\CustomUE4.

      Would it be possible for you or someone to share a screenshot of their key param ? I'm just wondering if I leave the value name at default.

      Thanks

      Jesse

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        #4
        Icerice I have a whitepaper talking about how to use install builds. You can find it here: https://www.wisengineering.com/resources.html and it breaks down the registry keys/etc. But yes you basically do it by sharing the editor binaries in source control. Now my paper is more about working on multiple projects but the same can be done for a single. For your artists, they will have to make sure all of the prereqs are installed and then someone will have to add that key. This happens automatically if you run setup.bat in an install build.

        It's a simple match up. Under that registry key there will be a bunch of subkeys with GUIDs for the names. UE4 uses the EngineAssociation option of the uproject file to pick which version of the engine to use. FYI: You don't have to use GUIDs there.. it's just how Epic does it. I use text names so I can tell what project is what.
        Joseph Wilcox
        [Technical Director] WisEngineering
        https://www.wisengineering.com
        https://www.digitalleprechaun.com

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