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What is the best way to start with UE and C++?

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    What is the best way to start with UE and C++?

    Hello my friends,

    i know, this was certainly asked many times, but i want to know something about to start with C++ and UE4.
    Sure, there are a lot of snippets and Little tutorials on the wiki page, and there is the Epic documention too. But honestly, i can't do anything with it.

    I tried to code, but it is realy hard for me to understand the Syntax. What is going on with all the: xxx :: xxx or the &xxx. Then there are the
    classes, upropertys and so on.

    I came up with this because i wanted to use the callback from gamemode -> I want use the PastTravelEnd (or how it is called).
    Now. I do not know how to use this. Where should i call it, how can i use this with blueprints and so on.

    My question is: Is there a good beginner tutorial that explain all things step by step. I mean, declarations, pionters and so on. The API doc
    is realy small. If you look at Gamestudio (i know, a very old engine), there is the documentation very good and big. And for every Action (function or void...)
    there is a Little code snippet on how to use it.

    Then, is there a tutorial on how to use C++ with multiplayer? Not only to make a Lobby or Server travel. I mean something to how to use overlapping Events, damage calls,
    and much more a multiplayer game. In no tutorial is this explained. Only the Lobby Thing. Before someone say: Look into the shootergame from epic. I did it. But i don't know
    how to start. I don't understand what was coded first and how is it used in the game. This source is for People that ar familiar with C++ and the UE4 API. Not for Noobs like me.

    My current Project is blueprint with use of C++. It is just started. Should i start completly from the beginning only with C++ or should i use both together? I would be happy if
    someone can help me with my Problem.

    Greetings
    Beregron
    Last edited by Beregron; 04-26-2017, 05:08 AM.
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    #2
    I have begun with blueprints and after half a year I started to learn Basic C++. Then I made the Tutorials of C++ and after that I made a moveable Character and a house Generator, mostly in C++. And I recommend you to make everything with components like adding and deleting in blueprints, but the rest is simple to Code, if you have learned enough. You really should begin with normal C++ first and then to Unreal Engine.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for your answer. I am not sure if i can learn it. But with gamestudio i coded in Lite-C. Something like a C# language but a Little bit easier. Maybe i see Problems where are no Problems are. Anyway, i will give it a try and begin with the Basics. I hope i learn it... )
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        #4
        Yes you can, it just takes time. Whatever you learn won't be wasted because most languages are procedural (groan).
        Graham Chow
        Strange Orbitz (strangeorbitz.com)

        Comment


          #5
          I started if and it was a Epic fail. There's a lot of websites and stuff out there that say they'll teach you this is and that but it's a bad way to go about things in my opinion. I suggest school really.

          Comment


            #6
            When the UDK came out, I wanted to learn UnrealScript. But it was way too difficult. Then UE4 came out, and they switched to C++. Even more difficult. But I started doing some coding in Unity and .NET and learned a lot.

            I then started with learning C++ itself, but it was still very difficult. Then I just started coding in Unreal, combined with Blueprint, and managed to do and learn a lot. Now, I'm just learning as I go, always using Google, the forums, and Answerhub to search for solutions or guides. So far, it's going well, and I'm primarily an artist, also studying that at school. I did have to learn Haxe, but the rest I learned myself. The programming teachers even said I'm quite good.

            So my advice: keep at it. If you really want to learn, you have to make an effort. And it will take quite some time before you can make anything practical. Also, get comfortable with Blueprint first, then make something functional, and finally try to port it to C++. With BP you can at least get something working, and then figure out how it can be made in code. That's how I did it.
            Portfolio: https://www.artstation.com/final-frontier
            Stargate & DHD: https://forums.unrealengine.com/comm...5-stargate-dhd

            Comment


              #7
              C++ is a very difficult language. It takes long time and a level of intelligence. C# is easier, I think, but C++ runs faster.

              Comment


                #8
                If you're ok with paid courses, look for Udemy Unreal Engine course – it starts from the scratch.
                Also you can check C++ tutorialsright on the UE4 website.

                About what should you use – my opinion is better to code some basic stuff in C++ and then connect it and/or listen events with blueprints
                Working on the Knightmare Lands game.
                Contacts: telegram, twitter, website, email

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                  #9
                  I started with a class on udemy.com by Ben Tristem. Three weeks ago I didn't even know what a return type was. Today I can write a nested loop with if statements. It has taken a lot of time to understand the logic behind the the things you write in your .cpp files. I have sunk at least forty hours into the class, I making sure I fully understand everything I do in c++ and why. It took me a couple days to get past a certain threshold of his videos. Just keep rewatching and coding along with him, and if it really doesn't make sense, i always google search "eli5 + the term I am searching" someone on reddit always has an explanation that is dumbed down for a beginner.
                  Last edited by trailbla7er; 04-30-2017, 10:46 PM.

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                    #10
                    I think it takes a few years really to get your head around C++. I've being trying to teach my daughter C#....

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                    Graham Chow
                    Strange Orbitz (strangeorbitz.com)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      [MENTION=27173]funkinessfactor[/MENTION] Man, you are the living hero!

                      As for me, I studied C++ a bit at university. After that I've been working with it sometimes for several months in year, but still I am at the noobie-doobie level. It's because C++ grows faster than we get used to it. Don't even try to understand Epic's version of this language. Start with side plugins or simple open source projects. Step-by-step and something will click into your head.
                      Available for contract hiring! Complex mechanics, quick game prototyping, VR, AI, Animation, Tools for designers.

                      Check out my latest game! Last Joy - 2D RPG with unique combat system.

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                        #12
                        OP do not listen these guys who tell you "it's complicated" and "you'll spend years" or whatever! Just look for any tutorials/lesssons and learn. Also C++ has VERY large community and you always can find someone for advice.
                        Working on the Knightmare Lands game.
                        Contacts: telegram, twitter, website, email

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                          #13
                          I think, for unreal you don't need the hard things like polymorphism or memory handling, am I right?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by funkinessfactor View Post
                            I think it takes a few years really to get your head around C++. I've being trying to teach my daughter C#....

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                            I think, for unreal you don't need the hard things like polymorphism or memory handling, am I right?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I need to say, that I have forgotten half of the things I've learned in my only-C++-time, but I can handle the things of unreal engine.

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