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    How limited are blueprints?

    How limited are blueprints? Should I try learn C++ instead of blueprints? Are there any well known/good games which use blueprints? I'm going to try to learn either blueprints or c++ and I don't want to pick one to realize the other one is better. Blueprints seem easier but limited and c++ looks really hard but I bet you can do loads with it. If anyone can tell me their opinion on it or any good games they know created with blueprints, I appreciate it.

    Thanks in advance!

    #2
    Originally posted by Chickenator View Post
    How limited are blueprints? Should I try learn C++ instead of blueprints? Are there any well known/good games which use blueprints? I'm going to try to learn either blueprints or c++ and I don't want to pick one to realize the other one is better. Blueprints seem easier but limited and c++ looks really hard but I bet you can do loads with it. If anyone can tell me their opinion on it or any good games they know created with blueprints, I appreciate it.

    Thanks in advance!
    You seem to think that you have to choose one or the other, but the fact of the matter is is that they work well together, and even if you choose to use C++, you will find yourself using blueprints to save time and effort on smaller things. The question of how limited blueprints are really varies from person to person, I have 4+ years of computer programming experience, and am limited all the time by blueprints, as my expectations are very high, while someone that is just starting out will say that blueprints can do anything they've ever dreamt of. None of us will really be able to point out which games use blueprints, as there really is no way to tell, but I can guarantee you most games released using UE4 use blueprints in some form or another.
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      #3
      Also to add there are a few things that aren't widely known how to do in c++ such as control animations as well as in blueprints, make a gui as well as in blueprints (umg specifically) and do ai as well as in blueprints. So those are a few areas you will likely have to use blueprint for anyway.

      Also, if someone knows how to do those things teach me!! Lol

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        #4
        Originally posted by Jamendxman3 View Post
        You seem to think that you have to choose one or the other, but the fact of the matter is is that they work well together, and even if you choose to use C++, you will find yourself using blueprints to save time and effort on smaller things. The question of how limited blueprints are really varies from person to person, I have 4+ years of computer programming experience, and am limited all the time by blueprints, as my expectations are very high, while someone that is just starting out will say that blueprints can do anything they've ever dreamt of. None of us will really be able to point out which games use blueprints, as there really is no way to tell, but I can guarantee you most games released using UE4 use blueprints in some form or another.
        Originally posted by Pumpy Bird View Post
        Also to add there are a few things that aren't widely known how to do in c++ such as control animations as well as in blueprints, make a gui as well as in blueprints (umg specifically) and do ai as well as in blueprints. So those are a few areas you will likely have to use blueprint for anyway.

        Also, if someone knows how to do those things teach me!! Lol
        Thanks for the answers! So there's some way to link blueprints and C++? I heard that most people use Blueprints for quick prototyping. Is this right?

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          #5
          Originally posted by Chickenator View Post
          Thanks for the answers! So there's some way to link blueprints and C++? I heard that most people use Blueprints for quick prototyping. Is this right?
          Blueprints and C++ both generate UClasses. But blueprints are downstream from any C++ code you write, so keep that in mind, e.g it's really easy to reference C++ data, functions..etc from Blueprints, it's much harder to reference blueprint define info in C++. You can reference blueprint provided classes from C++, but you have to do it by asset reference. Try to think of C++ as where you'll define how the AMonster works, and blueprints as a method of subclassing AMonster, and making AMonsterOrc, AMonsterGoblin...etc In blueprints you might do a little bit of fine tuning, definitely some asset swaps, and customization as far as health/mana/loot table...etc, but the code that more or less defines what it means to be a monster, how it will act...etc is probably in C++.

          Blueprints are great for prototyping, and they're even great in the final product, so long as you understand what it costs to use them. A 'data only' blueprint is the best one, they're effectively no different than a native class, they just have different data serialized for them to disk, so it's different default properties when the instance is loaded into memory. Blueprints that do stuff based on events, are ok, since they only potentially run expensive code when something happens to them. Blueprints that do something every tick, they're a lot more costly.
          Last edited by NickDarnell; 10-12-2015, 04:52 PM.

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            #6
            Originally posted by NickDarnell View Post
            Blueprints and C++ both generate UClass. But blueprints are downstream from any C++ code you right, so keep that in mind, e.g it's really easy to reference C++ data, functions..etc from Blueprints, it's much harder to reference blueprint define info in C++. You can reference blueprint provided classes from C++, but you have to do it by asset reference. Try to think of C++ as where you'll define how the AMonster works, and blueprints as a method of subclassing AMonster, and making AMonsterOrc, AMonsterGoblin...etc In blueprints you might do a little bit of fine tuning, definitely some asset swaps, and customization as far as health/mana/loot table...etc, but the code that more or less defines what it means to be a monster, how it will act...etc is probably in C++.

            Blueprints are great for prototyping, and they're even great in the final product, so long as you understand what it costs to use them. A 'data only' blueprint is the best one, they're effectively no different than a native class, they just have different data serialized for them to disk, so it's different default properties when the instance is loaded into memory. Blueprints that do stuff based on events, are ok, since they only potentially run expensive code when something happens to them. Blueprints that do something every tick, they're a lot more costly.
            A lot of things you said didn't make sense to me. I'm incredibly new to Unreal Engine but thanks for the answer. It helped clear some stuff up

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