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External Archviz - Landscape and foliage studies

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  • replied
    Excellent work , i love the touch u have made with the birds , the sky and the smooth wind effect on the palms ,,, man u are an artist ,,, but if i may ask about the sky , is it as cube map or its it just a sphere ??

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  • replied
    Rabellogp. I came across your thread while scouring the web for a Royal Palm for UE4. ...very happy I did. I have spend the last few days reviewing all your related post from UE3 days.
    Excellent work bro!! Thank you for sharing in such detail. I am gonna give it my best shot, anywhere near that quality and Ill be a happy camper.
    You mentioned that you may make your trees available for purchase at some point. Please please please do! I'm working on a archviz renovation of a neighbor's house surrounded by Royals. (took a pic out my window as I wrote this) it would be really helpful.Click image for larger version

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    Keep up the great work!
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  • replied
    This project is amazing and thanks for all of your knowledge! I don't think I'll ever have the patience to achieve such results.

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  • replied
    Amazing work man....how do you make that birds.....Is this is a single guy work or a team work ??

    Here is my first unreal archviz work, pls somebody suggest me how to create a realistic mirror material ? I am newbie and don't know the coding....is there any video tutorial so please let me know.



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  • replied
    And it's tricky because some meshes are better in one piece, to avoid seams when you build light. Like ceilings and floors. That's why I often detach each faces of a mesh and assign a lightmap to each face. To maximize pixel density!

    But there are ways to hide those seams pretty easily. Like vertex painting a bit of imperfections to cover the seams, stuff like that.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by duke22 View Post
    What limitations? Max resolution or some other quirk?
    Heartlessphil is right. 2048 is pretty much your practical lightmap resolution limit. Personally I like to keep everything under 1024 as 2048 will increase my lighting build time substantially... So you can keep increasing the lightmap resolution of a mesh until you get the quality you want. But once you reach 1024 or 2048, you'll need to start reducing the surface area size to keep increasing the lightmap pixel density. And the only way to reduce the surface area size of a mesh while keeping its size is to break it into peaces with their own lighmaps.

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  • replied
    But you can group them in unreal after that, with ctrl+g. Just don't merge all the meshes together!

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  • replied
    Originally posted by duke22 View Post
    What limitations? Max resolution or some other quirk?
    It's because a single lightmap for a whole building would not give accurate shadow results. You can't really have a lightmap of higher resolution than 2048 (performance-wise) and it's way to small to contain all the faces of a whole building. Best way is to separate meshes and assign a UV map to each part. It's an unreal limitation.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by rabellogp View Post
    Thanks, man! I'll do it! =)



    It's all broken to pieces. Something like one or two walls per mesh. And this is only because of lightmap limitations, otherwise I'd definitely import all the walls as a single mesh with multiple materials if needed.
    What limitations? Max resolution or some other quirk?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by 3DForgeTeam View Post
    Looks amazing!
    How did you manage to get such clean and accurate reflections on windows?
    Thanks!

    I've used a Scene Capture Cube. I've showed how to use it: https://forums.unrealengine.com/show...=1#post_341330

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  • replied
    Looks amazing!
    How did you manage to get such clean and accurate reflections on windows?

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  • replied
    Originally posted by heartlessphil View Post
    Your palms are fantastic. Put that on marketplace :-)
    Thanks, man! I'll do it! =)

    Originally posted by seenooh View Post
    Hey man! Great work.

    I got a question for you with regards to the villa itself. Did you import the building as a single mesh? Have grouped similar stuff together (i.e. walls as one object, all windows as one object etc)? Or is everything broken down to small pieces?
    It's all broken to pieces. Something like one or two walls per mesh. And this is only because of lightmap limitations, otherwise I'd definitely import all the walls as a single mesh with multiple materials if needed.

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  • replied
    Hey man! Great work.

    I got a question for you with regards to the villa itself. Did you import the building as a single mesh? Have grouped similar stuff together (i.e. walls as one object, all windows as one object etc)? Or is everything broken down to small pieces?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Your palms are fantastic. Put that on marketplace :-)

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  • replied
    Ok. I think I've achieved something good enough for my taste


    http://i.imgur.com/D97V5Go.jpg


    One of the variations, highest LOD, inside Speedtree:
    Attached Files
    Last edited by rabellogp; 08-11-2015, 01:21 PM.

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