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    #16
    so how did you get the materials all seperated with dwg solid export? what steps are involved i tried this.

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      #17
      I export as DWG 2013, import with "split by material", and most come in as multi/sub object materials, some as a single material that can be added to the multi/sub, and if convert the meshes to poly a wall with no windows is 8 verts/12 edges just like a box in Max, so a a very clean model.

      This is in Revit/Max 2015, with latest updates.

      Elliptical shapes are better to seperately import(FBX) or model in Max though.

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        #18
        Would you mind posting a few screen shots of the process, outlining some of the material related things? I'm assuming since you mention that they ''came in with multi/sub object mats" that you did your material assigning in revit? Or did you do revit>dwg 2013>max>fbx>ue4? or revit>dwg2013>max>dwg2013>ue4?

        Really appreciate it as the visuals that come with unity are pretty paltry.

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          #19
          Originally posted by ArchVizVR View Post
          Would you mind posting a few screen shots of the process, outlining some of the material related things? I'm assuming since you mention that they ''came in with multi/sub object mats" that you did your material assigning in revit? Or did you do revit>dwg 2013>max>fbx>ue4? or revit>dwg2013>max>dwg2013>ue4?

          Really appreciate it as the visuals that come with unity are pretty paltry.
          Just noticed the post(on a travel), so may be a bit late
          It´s just manual export of ver 2013 DWG from Revit with "solids" enabled, then import with "Layer, Blocks as Node Hierarchy to Max , Split by Material"
          You might also tick weld option, and set solid curve res to your taste, and if a complex model merge as much as possible before export to FBX, since UE4 import takes more time merging then Max, and it merges everything.

          In Max I not do anything with the materials, they transfer with textures also, but I replace them in UE4 anyway.
          This is with latest updates, so DWG exports very fast, and I don't use Suite workflow.

          So I select one mesh, modify tab, then "attach list" add the meshes I want joined, and if different materials a multi/sub is created.
          Then you can convert to poly if want less edges/bevel/smooth etc.

          I use LPV in UE4 so I just add a uvmap modifier to adjust the texture tiling, and everything animated like doors/elevators are not merged.
          Last edited by Graute; 02-28-2015, 06:00 PM.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Atle View Post
            Just noticed the post(on a travel), so may be a bit late
            It´s just manual export of ver 2013 DWG from Revit with "solids" enab...................
            Not late at all
            This is all really good information (much appreciated!), I'm more or less just over the cusp of grasping some of the max/ue4 concepts, so I'm going to try and relay some of this back to you in a linear way to make sure I understand your process.

            1. Revit dwg 2013 export w/ mentioned options ticked.
            2. If a complex model, merge objects in 3ds max where possible.
            2.5. Select one mesh>modify>attach list modifier>convert to editable poly for optimization. (I'm assuming this is all in max)
            3. Export from max to ue4 via fbx.
            4. Replace materials/textures(these are considered the 'same' things right?). I'm going to need to find a few tutorials to help deal with ue4 material assigning/editing

            You mentioned LPV (going to have to research this, I'm not familiar with the term, or benefits) and using a uvmap modifier(in max correct?). So this step would fall somewhere around 2-2.5.

            Thanks for fleshing out your process a bit more for us!

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              #21
              Just tested Revit FBX with latest updates, and seems the problems are fixed for walls/windows etc. so very nice geometry.
              Curved railings/columns still need to be exported as DWG 2013 though, if FBX they have many triangles., and converting to poly´s mess them up.

              In UE4 you can just select materials in the model and click the white arrow, and it will replace the imported Max ver with one selected in the material browser, and LPV is kind of a fast dynamic realtime GI so you don´t need unwrapping uv´s in Max, and setting up for lightmaps.

              If you want precomputed lightning, clean/not complex geometry is good, and do not merge large/complex assets, but export in pieces if want the automatic UV generation on import to UE4, complex meshes will not autogenerate 2 UV maps, or bad ones most of the time when I´ve tried it. https://docs.unrealengine.com/latest...mes/index.html

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                #22
                Does anybody have experience using UE4 for MEP visualization?

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