Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Initial Thoughts after 1 month using UE 4.24 for ArchViz

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Interesting thread, My Thought using UE 4.24 for ArchViz is - UE is not reliable for archviz professional big scale projects, for small scale may be it can be good but big scale projects you cant rely on ue4.
    I have been trying to test medium scale interior project but couldn't succeed i was wasting most of the time finding solution for errors one after another, imagine if it was a real world paid project with deadline, i am sure client would have been cancelled the project eventually because of time and he'd have lost trust in me for any future projects.

    Imagine if you try to work on exterior big scale project where will you end up.

    The projects what we see on youtube with realistic quality either its small project done in free time or it is done by big studio with big technical team.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Prav2pkp View Post
      I have been trying to test medium scale interior project but couldn't succeed i was wasting most of the time finding solution for errors one after another, imagine if it was a real world paid project with deadline, i am sure client would have been cancelled the project eventually because of time and he'd have lost trust in me for any future projects.
      Do you mean specifically UE 4.24 or using Unreal Engine in general with ArchViz? If you are referring to 4.24 specifically, I can understand that since this release does nto seem like a great release for ArchViz users. Someone just posted somewhere that the compiling issues will be fixed in 4.24.2 and then I saw it will be 4.25. I am not doing any projects in 4.24 as I just do not trust it for the very concerns you mentioned. I cannot risk losing a client with delays trying to troubleshoot.

      As for using UE in ArchViz, I have been getting better at establishing a workflow that leads to some pretty predictable results but these have not been large scenes. I am about to try again with a new scene (interiors model) that will be a bit more robust. I also use Enscape which is a real time engine specifically for archviz that is pretty hard to beat in regards to ease of use. However, I want to go much more custom so I keep playing with Unreal. If it were not for Datasmith, I would have had to probably abandon this effort awhile ago.

      The thing about NOT using realtime renderers is you get into significant amounts of rendering time to generate fixed renderings and even more time to generate any sort of walkthrough. I am predicting these offline renderers are going to be less common as realtime technology keeps improving.

      Comment


        #18
        One way to speed up data transfer - especially for large projects - is to use the newly added Data prep editor where you can define what and how things are imported from other packages...yes its still in beta and needs to be activated via the plugin to work but it could make the difference if you're on a deadline....once you set it up you can just re-import new files with ease...

        Unreal offers perhaps too many options but if you focus just on what's important to get the job done its not that bad....I used to work in vfx standard rendering workflows before switching to realtime...and yes it took me a while to reestablish my orientation - the same workflows do not apply...however the basics do - good modeling is still paramount, attention to texturing and good lighting will get you very high results in Unreal...

        In any case if anyone's interested I have a couple of tutorials on youtube about raytracing and beveling edges - as someone mentioned was an issue for him....

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSMJEYkDuB8&t=51s

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7VL1wt2wO0&t=53s

        Comment

        Working...
        X