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    Real time Raytracing

    My company are about to purchase two new machines with 2080 Ti cards. Along with Lumion after a freelancer showed them its capabilities. I’m very pro UE4 and not particularly keen to use it.

    I would like to know if I utilize the real-time Raytracing can I expect to output 4K movies without it crashing? Compared to Lumion what’s the best way to save renders? Is this still by high res screen grabs, but turning on game mode? Does turning on viewport pathtracing have any benefits?

    Would I need to do any additional setup in UE4 to turn on Raytracing or is it just accessed in the post process volume and settings within the Console Comand?

    have enjoyed briefly using Twinmotion so would be great to see that further developed!

    Thanks for any advice!

    #2
    Here's the info on how to setup raytracing: https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-US/...ing/index.html

    As far as crashing goes, that might depend on if you end up using too much GPU memory, but most likely not, especially if you're doing archviz
    For taking screenshots there's the high res screenshot option, for video there's Sequencer which can save to an image sequence. Path tracing is for doing higher quality renders, so it'll take longer but will look a bit better: https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-US/...cer/index.html

    Looks like Lumion hasn't been updated to support the raytracing cards, so it's going to be a bit slower on that front, but the advantage there is that many of its features are designed for archviz that UE4 just doesn't have.

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      #3
      I've been trialing the ray tracing with UE4 on our existing UE4 projects. It's hard to say whether it is any use as yet. My workstation is a dual xeon, 256gb ram 2080ti beast and even a basic hotel room scene crashes a bit when cranking up the quality settings to get something usable.

      That said, it performs much better on exterior scenes, but I suspect it is heavily dependent on scene optimisation and picking the right number of samples etc per scene (which is fair enough)

      As for accessing it, it's just an option you activate, then it is controlled through both the post processing volume for and on a per-light basis for GI (eg; control samples on each light source and overall sampling in PP volume)

      Pretty easy to use and quite gratifying.
      Eliot Blenkarne
      Visualiser
      Warren and Mahoney Architects ltd

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Visualisation View Post
        I've been trialing the ray tracing with UE4 on our existing UE4 projects. It's hard to say whether it is any use as yet. My workstation is a dual xeon, 256gb ram 2080ti beast and even a basic hotel room scene crashes a bit when cranking up the quality settings to get something usable.

        That said, it performs much better on exterior scenes, but I suspect it is heavily dependent on scene optimisation and picking the right number of samples etc per scene (which is fair enough)

        As for accessing it, it's just an option you activate, then it is controlled through both the post processing volume for and on a per-light basis for GI (eg; control samples on each light source and overall sampling in PP volume)

        Pretty easy to use and quite gratifying.
        Thanks Eliot for the low down. Some useful information and food for thought.

        Cheers
        Jim

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          #5
          Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post
          Here's the info on how to setup raytracing: https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-US/...ing/index.html

          As far as crashing goes, that might depend on if you end up using too much GPU memory, but most likely not, especially if you're doing archviz
          For taking screenshots there's the high res screenshot option, for video there's Sequencer which can save to an image sequence. Path tracing is for doing higher quality renders, so it'll take longer but will look a bit better: https://docs.unrealengine.com/en-US/...cer/index.html

          Looks like Lumion hasn't been updated to support the raytracing cards, so it's going to be a bit slower on that front, but the advantage there is that many of its features are designed for archviz that UE4 just doesn't have.
          Thanks darthviper for a very honest valued opinion. Will be looking at that in detail.

          Many thanks
          Jim

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