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    Wall, room, house workflow

    Hi, after some attempts to get something good, I'm here to ask for your help with some best practices with workflow.

    i can't find a workflow to build some real and existing apartment or house without issues in lightmap baking.

    For example "my grandma house" (WIP) is one big static mesh made with walls/ceilings/floors in one group and stairs/windows and details grouped apart.

    I suppose that isn't the right way to achieve what i expect in UE4.

    First of all yeah... i came from Sketchup, i' ve done something nearly OK in past with UE4 but it was one room and on a one single floor (my home, image 3).

    I can't find a way to group and organize my rooms without going crazy,.
    My goal is a playable walktrough from the street to the house, so i've to bake light even in the external wall.

    Should i group faces inside every room and group external faces in another group(img 4) or suggest to keep solid mesh ?



    My grandma house section my house

    #2
    Sketchup isnt the greatest thing for game modeling. You should look up blender tutorials on how to create a lightmap. It's free, and there are tons of tutorials on the web.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by thadkinsjr View Post
      Sketchup isnt the greatest thing for game modeling. You should look up blender tutorials on how to create a lightmap. It's free, and there are tons of tutorials on the web.
      Thanks thadkinsjr, i know that. I use Blender for lightmap UV channel creation, but i'm talking about mesh creation workflow.
      Now i'm using Steamroller script in 3dsmax but I'm trying to figure out some best practice on "how" to build an house that is not software dependent .



      1) ONE BIG MESH
      In my first try i've build one solid mesh with only different materials for external faces and internal faces.
      PRO - Easy and simple
      CONS - Obviously with this method you should increase Lightmap resolution to some insane value.

      2) STATIC MESH FOR EVERY WALL
      PRO - Really good Lightmap Resolution even at 512/1024 for walls
      CONS - Maybe texture seams

      3) GROUP INTERNAL ROOM FACES
      PRO - Lightmap will be applied only on visible faces
      CONS - Big room still have bad Lightmap res

      4) STATIC MESH FOR EVERY SINGLE FACE
      PRO - Lighmap will be applied only on visible faces and can use maximum space/quality for your Lightmap UV island
      CONS - Well... is a planar normal... mmh...

      5) MODULAR APPROACH
      PRO - You have to make only a few mesh, great performance,
      CONS - Not really Archviz-oriented, especially with pre-existent house with a lot of different sizes.
      A lot of texture seams if you don't pay attention.

      So... i'm puzzled... what would your workflow be like with "my grandma house"



      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Torakiki View Post

        Thanks thadkinsjr, i know that. I use Blender for lightmap UV channel creation, but i'm talking about mesh creation workflow.
        Now i'm using Steamroller script in 3dsmax but I'm trying to figure out some best practice on "how" to build an house that is not software dependent .



        1) ONE BIG MESH
        In my first try i've build one solid mesh with only different materials for external faces and internal faces.
        PRO - Easy and simple
        CONS - Obviously with this method you should increase Lightmap resolution to some insane value.

        2) STATIC MESH FOR EVERY WALL
        PRO - Really good Lightmap Resolution even at 512/1024 for walls
        CONS - Maybe texture seams

        3) GROUP INTERNAL ROOM FACES
        PRO - Lightmap will be applied only on visible faces
        CONS - Big room still have bad Lightmap res

        4) STATIC MESH FOR EVERY SINGLE FACE
        PRO - Lighmap will be applied only on visible faces and can use maximum space/quality for your Lightmap UV island
        CONS - Well... is a planar normal... mmh...

        5) MODULAR APPROACH
        PRO - You have to make only a few mesh, great performance,
        CONS - Not really Archviz-oriented, especially with pre-existent house with a lot of different sizes.
        A lot of texture seams if you don't pay attention.

        So... i'm puzzled... what would your workflow be like with "my grandma house"


        I'm not an archviz expert, but I would do interior walls as one mesh combined to try to prevent shadowing at seams, and increase light map resolution. Then have floors combined with outside. With modular components a lot of people have issues where the mesh corners intersects. I also get some strange shadows so I add a touch of bloom to my mesh in order to get a fade. I didnt hook up a normal map yet to this wood. The mesh corner is an asian architecture component for a game. The lightmap on my ceiling is small so it comes out dimmer than the pillar and supports. If I increase lightmap resolution than the outside of the roof would be extremely bright. This is a big tip. The more you can sew uv islands together in your uv the better it looks when building lighting. Whether you go with 2 corners, or full interior is up to you.
        Attached Files

        Comment


          #5
          For interiors split up the walls into one object and the ceiling to another and the floor to another, if those meshes are very large still (a lot of surface area) then split them up further. When you split things up try to split them based on natural lines, so the corner of a wall is a good split rather than the middle of a wall. You can see if you can split them by rooms so you might have a wall mesh for a room along with a ceiling and a floor mesh.
          Also, it looks like you might have some overlapping stuff, like if you have a box modeling some part of the ceiling it's going to have a shadow underneath where it is placed and that shadow will partially be visible around it since the lightmap pixels will not line up perfectly with things that are placed on top of other things. To fix that you have to make sure that walls/ceiling/floors do not extend beyond each other or overlap.

          Comment


            #6
            I use a Sketchup to 3ds max workflow. I attached a picture of a project that I'm currently working on. Everything other than the props were done in Sketchup. I use the solids tool in Sketchup and create one big solid. Then I break the solid apart by faces. Each wall in this project is it's own mesh. I split the trim at the corners into groups. The fireplace was it's own solid and I broke it down into probably 40-50 meshes, to make it easier to uv map in 3ds max. Every mesh needs a texture assigned to it in sketchup before exporting to 3ds max, otherwise you'll get errors in UE4 for some reason.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by danimal8361 View Post
              I use a Sketchup to 3ds max workflow. I attached a picture of a project that I'm currently working on. Everything other than the props were done in Sketchup. I use the solids tool in Sketchup and create one big solid. Then I break the solid apart by faces. Each wall in this project is it's own mesh. I split the trim at the corners into groups. The fireplace was it's own solid and I broke it down into probably 40-50 meshes, to make it easier to uv map in 3ds max. Every mesh needs a texture assigned to it in sketchup before exporting to 3ds max, otherwise you'll get errors in UE4 for some reason.
              So, your static mesh for walls/roof/ceiling in UE4 is not a solid, but a one sided flat mesh?


              Click image for larger version

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              This wall are colored "by mesh" (oops there's a mistake on B in the Aqua/red wall... well...)

              Sorry for this quick example, but i'm not at my computer, which one of this method do you prefer?
              And if it's wrong, why?

              A) Solid wall mesh / split by walls

              B) Flat mesh by wall face

              My goal was a walktrough from street to home so i have to render both external wall and internal
              Attached Files

              Comment


                #8
                danimal8361, in 3ds max, do you use UVWMAP and manually unfold for each object? or do you use steamroller for everything?
                I use a sketchup to 3ds max workflow but I am stuck on the UVWMAP on objects with complex mesh. Thanks.
                interior designer, CREAPI

                Comment


                  #9
                  My mesh would look like your example B. The only reason I make it a solid mesh first, is so there aren't overlapping meshes. In my picture from the previous post, there isn't any interior wall behind the base trim for example. I attached pictures of my workflow in sketchup. The most important thing in sketchup is to export with texture assigned to every face, like in my example 3. If not, you'll get mikktspace tangent errors in ue4 and bad lightmap on some meshes.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by danimal8361 View Post
                    My mesh would look like your example B. The only reason I make it a solid mesh first, is so there aren't overlapping meshes. In my picture from the previous post, there isn't any interior wall behind the base trim for example. I attached pictures of my workflow in sketchup. The most important thing in sketchup is to export with texture assigned to every face, like in my example 3. If not, you'll get mikktspace tangent errors in ue4 and bad lightmap on some meshes.
                    Yes! exactly what i want to know! From 1 to 2 you split and group every single wall -> texture it -> export in 3ds max (which format do you use? ) -> flat uv's -> export to .fbx



                    Comment


                      #11
                      The newer versions of 3ds max, probable 2014+, directly imports the default SKP file from Sketchup. You just have to save it to an older Sketchup version, like version 8.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by danimal8361 View Post
                        The newer versions of 3ds max, probable 2014+, directly imports the default SKP file from Sketchup. You just have to save it to an older Sketchup version, like version 8.
                        Thank you! I'll try It soon.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Danimal8361, I also use a Sketchup to 3ds max workflow but i stuck on UVWMAP for objects with mesh complex (sofas...). Do you use steamroller for all or do you use UVWMAP manually ? And yes, the newer versions of 3ds max imports SKP files easily.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I manually unwrap UV channel 1 (texture/ normal channel) and steamroll UV channel 2 (lightmap channel). If a texture looks good on your mesh, then the flattened UV channel 2 will be fine in UE4.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Oh... now i have weird behavior in export from 3ds max 2018 to fbx... from sketchup i'm saving file in sketchup 8 skp format (i work with millimeters), import in max with Units setup (millimeters) and it's all right. But when i export in fbx it doesn't matter which choice i do in units tab.... it will always is REAAAAAALLY big (it seems like 10 times) ...

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