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    Hello,

    as a shoutout to Koola. Asserts from the snow Example was use widely in a level in my game. Thanks.

    Check my working title: The Locked Room here: https://forums.unrealengine.com/show...he-locked-Room

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      Very impressive Koola. Just one question; have you turned off filmic tone mapping? or its an LUT with extreme Red and Blue values. Because red and blue reflections from emissive background looks physically incorrect to me. Or its an artistic choice? By the way, great job like always.

      Regards,
      Last edited by navid100; 10-07-2018, 06:33 PM.

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        Originally posted by navid100 View Post
        Very impressive Koola. Just one question; have you turned off filmic tone mapping? or its an LUT with extreme Red and Blue values. Because red and blue reflections from emissive background looks physically incorrect to me. Or its an artistic choice? By the way, great job like always.

        Regards,
        I don't follow what you're saying... His colors/lighting look correct to me, nothing looks "incorrect".
        Artstation

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          Originally posted by BoothDigital View Post

          I don't follow what you're saying... His colors/lighting look correct to me, nothing looks "incorrect".
          If you are familiar with realistic tone-mapping which is filmic, a red emissive color would not reflect or look complete red after tone mapping takes place. for instance go to material editor and create a simple emissive material with (10,0,0) emissive color witch is pure red. now if you look at it, it doesn't show red, it looks orange and this is how realistic emissive color should look. if you increase the emissive intensity to even higher values, more and more it drops red to more subtle orange. In real world example you can take a look at melting metals. when metal gets red it has a low temperature while when it gets hotter it shifts toward more orange color. Now to test that, open up console and disable filmic tone mapping by setting it to 0 (by default it is on = 1). Now look at your emissive material again. it just looks pure red just like Koola example work. The same thing goes for blue ... . If I remember correctly, filmic tone mapping is set to 1 by default after 4.15 release. And I didn't say anything about lighting, just the way emissive reflections look.

          Regards,
          Last edited by navid100; 01-08-2019, 06:52 AM.

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            You are the new Alex Roman for me. Truly inspiring. Please keep creating a great work like this.

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              ____________________________________________________________
              https://twitter.com/Koola_UE4

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                Stunning as usual...

                I notice a lot of people are asking you about techniques, but I'm more interested in the artistry behind your tests. I'm surprised by how simple a lot of the effects you use are, I believe what makes them come together so well is the mastery of light, textures & composition displayed in your videos. (Also why so many of my friends are fans of the HK project - the visuals are all straightforward modeling, texturing and lighting, only 10x better executed than what any of us can make :P)

                Are there any books, blogs, or resources you recommend that help you approach lighting from a more cinematic perspective? It's a topic I rarely see discussed in games.

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                  That storm scene is terrific! On a technical level, how did you create the volumetric light for the broken street light on the right? Is it just the old school cone mesh + falloff shader or are you doing something special to remove the temporal ghosting from Unreal's volumetric lighting?

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                    Originally posted by Nick! View Post
                    That storm scene is terrific! On a technical level, how did you create the volumetric light for the broken street light on the right? Is it just the old school cone mesh + falloff shader or are you doing something special to remove the temporal ghosting from Unreal's volumetric lighting?
                    It looks like there's still ghosting, but it actually contributes in this example because the camera movement is more static compared to the movement of the wind, debris, etc so the ghosting moves in the same direction. If you disable temporal reprojection on the volumetric fog, you'll notice jagged edges way more often than you'll see ghosting... if the fog is dense and if you have things intersecting/casting shadows in it at least.
                    Lighting Artist II @ Crystal Dynamics
                    ArtStation
                    Twitter

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                      do you have any examples of the particles on the ground and the rain? Not just the shader used.

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