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《Drifting: weight of feathers》Third-Person / Action / Shooter (Update: Broken Bridge)

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  • replied
    Thanks for the references. Ronin and Ghostrunner both look incredibly fun. I have a long ways to go in regards to control in game and there is more to it than the animation. Manual and autonomous control of Head (Cam), Arms (Weapon/ Reticle ), and Body (Navigation/Movement) are core elements of Gameplay as im aiming to achieve a VR experience without the VR Equipment. Camera control has a major role in my game as it will play both third and first person.
    Last edited by TechLord; 06-01-2020, 05:55 AM.

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  • replied
    Originally posted by TechLord View Post
    Hi rit

    Ocean Courtyard is Fantastical & Surreal. Love it. Just stop to by to catch up on your latest progress and show what you have inspired.

    Hello TechLord,

    I'm glad you liked the latest update of my project, thank you very much for stopping by! =)

    The video clip you showed demonstrate some stylish and slick animation especially in slow motion, I'm interested to see how the control feels like during gameplay!

    In the previous post, you've talked about how you wanted to develop a ninja game with sword and gun with acrobatics, I've happened to noticed two games that may provide a more direct inspiration than mine.

    If you are looking for a third-person ninja game experience, I think you might like to follow the devlog of Ronin 2072

    It's a two mans' project using UE4, currently still in development, however, from what I can tell in their monthly devlog, they made some tremendous progress over the past few months. Their latest devlog (uploaded 2 weeks ago) already demonstrate a solid gameplay loop with awesome level design - in terms of both aesthetic and gameplay.

    If you are looking for first-person experience, Ghostrunner is also made with UE4 and recently adopted ray-tracing features. Although it might be difficult for a one-man-team to achieve the same quality as this game, it already released a playable demo and I think it's worth checking out to get a feel of its controls and camera design - which are both easy to incorporate its features into your own game.

    I hope this information could help you with your game development, have a great day! =)

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Hi rit

    Ocean Courtyard is Fantastical & Surreal. Love it. Just stop to by to catch up on your latest progress and show what you have inspired.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Scenery in《Drifting》

    Itch.IO - Broken Bridge
    IndieDB - Broken Bridge

    Broken Bridge

    broken bridge
    (click the image for higher resolution)

    This bridge has been worn out by time and events happened years ago. From the sheer size and scale of its construction, one might suspect it was once the main traffic of its era.

    Now barely standing on its foot, and somehow still manage to provide the only way for the protagonist to reach to her destination, serving its last purpose in its remaining years.

    I hope you enjoy this week's update, have a relaxing weekend! :3

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  • replied
    The Making of Whale

    Itch.IO - The Making of Whale
    IndieDB - The Making of Whale

    whale jump

    (This beautiful ocean creature is a humpback whale. According to wikipedia, males are able to sing a complex song lasting 10~20 minutes)





    Hello everyone!

    In this week's update, I wrote an article describing the challenges I encountered and the solutions I came up with while making this beautiful ocean creature. I hope you enjoy reading it!

    Have a relaxing and wonderful weekend! ヽ(・∀・)ノ
    Last edited by rit; 05-23-2020, 09:56 AM.

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  • replied
    Scenery in《Drifting》

    Itch.IO - Ocean Courtyard
    IndieDB - Ocean Courtyard

    Ocean Courtyard

    ocean courtyard
    (click the image for higher resolution)

    15 years ago while I was in college, I've tried out silent hill 3 for the first time, without prior experience of the silent hill series, the game scared the hell out of me and I almost couldn't finish it. During the intense combat and psychological pressure, there is one small section in the game that gave me a tiny sense of comfort - an abandoned building where the protagonist arrived after escaping the sewer area. While the building is eerily silent, there is no enemy, no jump scare and I couldn't help but lingering for a while even though I know I could easily progress further by pushing the mattress down the floor.

    The game created a sharp contrast between intense pressure and a moment of comfort and safety - however brief it is - leave a profound impression in my mind, from which I could recall the rough layout of the building years after I finished the game.

    The ocean courtyard serves a similar purpose in terms of providing that sharp contrast. After players go through a series of challenging levels (especially the water dungeon area), the pacing of the game slows down, the width and height of the courtyard gave players plenty of space to maneuver, the low staircase and arched ceilings is a gesture of peace and harmony. I hope that as players enter the ocean courtyard, they could enjoy the soothing environment I created and maybe lingering for a while just like I did 15 years ago.

    I hope you enjoy this week's update, feel free to leave your thoughts on this subject, and have a wonderful weekend. =)

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  • replied
    A glimpse of combat in 《Drifting》

    Itch.IO - The Magic of 0.215
    IndieDB - The Magic of 0.215

    The Magic of 0.215


    Actions games are typically renown for challenging players' reaction time, whether the challenge comes in the form of last-second dodge, counter parry or perfect reload, a well-designed time interval is crucial to make players addicted to the mechanic instead of feeling frustrated because of it.

    As I was developing the attack behavior of my assassin character, I became aware of its sniper attack seems extremely hard to dodge. The sniper laser turned red 0.5s before she fires the shot - a signal that came too early and for multiple trials, I ended up dodging it too soon and got shot mid-air; I lowered the interval to 0.1s, expecting a closer timed signal and shot will result in a more accurate input from players, however, the situation isn't anywhere better - since the shot came almost immediately after the signal, I couldn't react to it and got shot before I could input anything.

    dodge bullet
    (for people who are curious about my reaction time, the test result for me is 0.257s 5 out of 5 trials - slightly below average)


    The problem persists for some time until I found out a site where you could test your own reaction time. Besides measuring my own reaction (to confirm whether the aforementioned problem is solely due to my incompetence to play my own game), more importantly, the site collects all the user data and provide statistics for the average users' reaction time. According to the statistics, the average users' reaction time is 0.215 seconds. Out of pure curiosity, I replace the value into my code and to my surprise, the assassin's shot becomes much easier to dodge - my perfect dodge rate increases from 30%~40% to near 70%~80% without actively concentrated on the signal.

    Besides solving the problem, I learned an important lesson that day - for NPC's attack time interval, player's input tolerance - if I couldn't find a suitable number, try the magic number 0.215! XD

    I hope you enjoy this week's update, have a great weekend! :3

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  • replied
    Hi rit

    I truly appreciate the thorough response. Sounds like ill have to dig into C++. My plate is full at the moment. I look deeper into integration when i get to the 'polish' stage. Going to put hair on everything including robots

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  • replied
    Originally posted by TechLord View Post
    Hi rit

    One of the most coolest visuals is the Hair. How did you do that Hair?

    Hi TechLord,

    I'm glad you like the hair rendering. =)

    The UE4 version I'm using is the one integrated by Nvidia (a GitHub account is required to view the page, or it might show 404 if you haven't logged in already). I followed the tutorials posted on Nvidia's official website to learn how the export pipeline works from third-party software (Maya or 3dsMax) to UE4.

    The tutorials are quite comprehensive and straight forward, watching one of them and you should know all the necessary steps to bring your grooming results to UE4.

    After exporting to UE4 and assign Hairworks asset to Hairworks component, the rest of the works involves a lot of tweaking and adjusting back and forth between third-party software and UE4 to achieve the looks and style you are aiming for - which is not very difficult but time-consuming and tedious - since, for every adjustment, you can't visualize the final result right away in UE4.

    That being said, while I have no experience with the latest version of UE, instead of using the Nvidia's GitHub branch, I will recommend trying out the hair grooming systems introduced since UE4.24, which is a fully integrated solution that allow developers to perform the grooming process in-engine and visualize the final results accordingly.

    Although from what I see in the tutorial video so far, the current UE4's hair grooming system lacks a lot of artistic controls compare to the Nvidia's branch, I believe the new hair grooming system is the officially supported one and Epic will probably improve the system in the future in terms of ease of use, hair simulation, and artistic controls.

    I hope this information could help you decide which route to take and get started with hair grooming.

    Have a wonderful weekend! :3

    P.S. If you decided to use Nvidia's branch, here is a short article I wrote about the tips and tricks I've learned using Nvidia's Hairworks tools.
    Last edited by rit; 05-03-2020, 07:20 AM.

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  • replied
    Hi rit

    One of the most coolest visuals is the Hair. How did you do that Hair?

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Scenery in《Drifting》

    Itch.IO - Spline Component Distance LOD
    IndieDB - Spline Component Distance LOD

    Spline Component Distance LOD


    spline component distance lod
    (the LOD distance in the image is reduced to 5000uu to better visualize the LOD effect)

    If an empty scene causing an RTX 2080 SUPER to run on 45 fps, then you know something isn't right about the game - that unfortunately, is what I've encountered during the development of the project.

    As I kept searching for clues that might cause the GPU's bottleneck, I stumbled across a helpful post explaining the proper way to setup spline actor distance LOD. It turns out the way I've setup spline distance LOD has no effect at all - since I was using dynamically constructed spline components, each component need to set up its own max draw distance individually - simply set the max draw distance of the spline actor itself will not affect each spline components (neither will set visibility).

    I adjust all the spline actor blueprints accordingly and packaged the game, run the game with 1920x1080, borderless mode, v-sync off - what I saw is an fps boost from 45 fps to 145 fps - a huge performance gain signify how leveraging distance LOD collectively could have a big impact on the final performance result.

    I hope you enjoy this week's update and won't make the same mistake I made!

    Have a nice weekend and stay healthy! (/>///<)/
    Last edited by rit; 05-03-2020, 06:23 AM.

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  • replied
    A glimpse of combat in 《Drifting》

    Throw Behind Fence

    Itch.IO - Throw Behind Fence
    IndieDB - Throw Behind Fence

    throw behind fence
    (click the image for higher resolution)

    As players progress through each level by throwing objects around to unlock the next challenge, at one point, they will face a peculiar challenge - throw an object to where they can see through but cannot aim directly - throw object behind a barbed fence.

    It is intuitive to throw an object forward to where the player could aim at, however, the game provides another way of throwing: sidewards and backward throws. These two types of throws although appear similar has different underlying mechanics. Compare to forward throw, sidewards and backward throws are target-oriented throws. As the player throw sidewards or backward, the game will perform a large area box trace and filter out the "appropriate" target to throw the object onto - a complex process involves distance check, angel check, target's tag (type) check, collision check...etc, to ensure the object is thrown to the intended target.

    Throw behind fence fully utilize the idea of target-oriented throw, since players cannot aim directly through fences, throwing sidewards or backward seem to be the more appropriate choice here. As I explore this idea, it opens up a wide range of gameplay possibilities - one of them is a puzzle where players need to throw an object onto an elevator; turn on the elevator so it reaches the second floor; from the first floor, throw the object from the elevator to another elevator at the far side; bring that far side elevator down to get to the object - an example that reflects the intricate dynamics between players and the game mechanics.

    I hope you enjoy this week's update, have a wonderful weekend! (づ′▽`)づ

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  • replied
    Originally posted by TechLord View Post
    Hi rit ,

    You are an inspiration. I stop by your post from time to time to see your latest update. You get my hyped up. I've been itching to develop a Ninja Game with sword & gunplay and acrobatics for months. I made a decision tonight, to move forward with converting my current work The Rianth into a Ninja Game, code name: SPAGHETTI.

    Keep up the awesome work!

    Hello @TechLord,

    I'm glad you are interested in the weekly updates and share your thoughts on game development. =)

    Experimenting and testing gameplay mechanics is part of the development cycle, it's always better to conduct drastic changes early on than later.

    I remember back in 2017 I was working on a fixed-camera, point-and-click, puzzle-solving game. After several months of iterations and prototyping, the game gradually changes from a pure puzzle-solving game to an action-oriented game - a change in development route I couldn't have imagined back then.

    Thank you again for your input. I wish you a lovely weekend and all the best for your project! :3

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  • replied
    Hi rit ,

    You are an inspiration. I stop by your post from time to time to see your latest update. You get my hyped up. I've been itching to develop a Ninja Game with sword & gunplay and acrobatics for months. I made a decision tonight, to move forward with converting my current work The Rianth into a Ninja Game, code name: SPAGHETTI.

    Keep up the awesome work!

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Scenery in《Drifting》

    Water Dungeon

    Itch.IO - Water Dungeon
    IndieDB - Water Dungeon

    water dungeon

    An article I posted last week talked about the process of building a maze-like level, the challenges I encountered and the solutions I came up with. As the construction of the maze level approaching its end, I figured the last section - the water prison section - might be a good place to test all the tips and tricks players acquired in the previous level and put them to good use.

    The design theme of the water prison level is as its name suggested: an instant death water plane lies just above the ocean surface, posing a constant death threat throughout the entire level. To balance the difficulty of the water prison section, I made the puzzles a lot straightforward to solve, however, players need to carefully plan out his/her every move and execute it with extra precision compare to other levels - a miss-step or an impetuous move will likely cost his/her life and starting over.
    Last edited by rit; 04-25-2020, 12:07 AM.

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