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Why You Should Forget Everything You Learned About Open World Games...

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  • replied
    We're building something like PlayStation Home, but...with more emphasis on 'Game'. Seeking Talent Codevelopers:

    Blueprints
    • Multiplayer Gameplay Scripter - skilled in reverse engineering and creating glue code between systems.
    • UI Scripter - knowledgeable with UMG animation system.
    • Animation System Expert - Understands all aspects of AnimBP and Animation Assets (Blendspaces, Montages, Statemachines, etc)
    Shader Programmer
    • Niagara Particle Systems Programmer.
    Technical
    • Advanced UE4 Material Artist - No Substance materials used.

    3D Modeler
    • Blender 3D (v2.8) Modeler - whom understands a Kitbashing workflow, familiar with Rigs and Blendshapes, can perform Retopo/Dissection of existing skeletal meshes.
    Level Designer
    • Level 'Layout' Designer - whom can Layout and Block Levels. Procedural Generation will be used to populate Blockouts with Architecture and Foliage.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by TechLord View Post

    The dynamic of 1 directional exchange: player trades time and real world currency for virtual awards will be replaced by a true 2 directional exchange: player will trade time and real world currency for both virtual and real world items/currency. Countless Virtual Jobs and Businesses will spawn, that can only have value and exist in cyberspace. I would predict Cyber Generated Revenue (CGR) to over-take the concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI) because, Human require purpose to exist.
    I agree, I was one of the original spawners of a virtual currency that would become universally acceptable for micro payments in virtual environments. However it has to be considered that it will never gain as much validity as one would hope. Exchange rates taken locally could mean some countries can gain wealth through giving good exchange rates locally, this will no doubt become infested by the black markets, this could also mean the removal of control over so many economies and those in that position, bearing in mind, all 'national' banks, Bank Of England, Bank of America etc etc, are all privately owned and not state controlled. Money laundering, evasion of taxes, moving money in and out of a country, etc are all hurdles that will control the outcome.

    You have an interesting concept and I very much wish you success.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by NoSpaceGameDev View Post
    My friends are dying for MMOs without an unnecessary time sink attached to it. Wow classic wastes time when it comes to raiding and a few of the endgame instances, but most of the game can be played in short bursts or even for longer periods easily and be enjoyable. Unless you are doing group material you can log out at anytime, and even then you can log out if you have to. In which they will just replace you. In MOBA's and competitive FPS its much more demanding of time. If you are trying to climb rank you will be locked into games until they are over which range from fifteen minutes to an hour with very little time to even go to the bathroom during game.

    There is still desire for good engaging MMOs unfortunately all the hurdles of making/financing one are stopping a lot of competition from entering the market. So we get a wow re-release and korean grind mmos. If the focus was less on wasting time and more on enjoying content, people would be all for it.




    This game is similar to roblox? Player generated worlds and content from a digital repository that can be built at run time.

    https://corp.roblox.com/2019/04/robl...ion-continues/

    It continues to grow and expand year on year. They are doing quite well.
    Short Answer

    Yes, GOD of DREAMS is similar to Roblox as in a creation platform which supports Game Masters and Players in creating Action FPS/RPG campaigns rapidly.
    • Intermixes Art Styles: Photo-realism, Voxels, Low Poly, Stylistic, Others.
    • Emphasizes on Collaborative Construction/Customization for Environment and Entities.
    • Procedural/Generative Content Systems for Environment and Entities.
    • Emphasizes FP Shooter Combat Mechanics.
    • RPG Elements inspired by Tabletop RPGs. A Tabletop RPG Experience Facilitator.

    Long Answer

    Tabletop RPGs such as (D&D, RIFTs, Generic Universal RolePlaying System) fuel my ideas for a RPG design. In Tabletop RPGs, the Game Masters and Players create the experience using pure imagination collaboratively. It was difficult to find this experience in Computer-based RPGs until I acquired the Adventure Construction Set. This was the closest game at the time that allow me to use lots of imagination to create RPG Adventures with a Computer interface. The only drawback was that I could use it in Single Player mode. I enjoyed creating, but had no enjoyment in playing what I created,because I already knew what to expect.

    In my opinion MMORPG design started on the wrong foot. It started from perspective of a Computer RPG Experience not a TableTop RPG Experience. The premise of sprawling fantasy world with thousands of players was appetizing, but truth is, Core concepts of a RPG go back to TableTop RPGs which only enough room for a Game Master and small Band of Players.
    We're re-engeering the MMORPG Design from the ground up based on a TableTop Experience designed for a massive number of concurrent players.

    Truth is not everyone can be a Super Hero, but you also dont need to be a Super Hero to be a Winner.

    Imagination is the key ingredient. Supporting rapid creation is the key to unleashing the Imagination. Rabid Creation using Collaborative Construction with Modular Parts ()Hyper-bashing) and Procedural Generation.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Immersive-Games View Post
    When I read your initial post, the first thing that surfaced in my thoughts was Minecraft. This was followed by Second Life/Opensim, then by most of the online games I play(ed), whereby some of those that create armour, mounts, pets etc get a % of the virtual selling price. Not every component is made in-house. Would it be fair to say that there are similarities? I ask because I was intrigued by your opening post Title.

    I personally believe MMO's will grow in use and blend the borders between those environments currently used by business, where reality is so paramount, they use the full stretch of today's technology to gain it. That technology, whilst out of reach to the average gamer for now, will soon become a reality. Feeling like you are there, will become so enriched when you realise the avatar beside you, is someone just like you, same goes for the whole team and not a puppet. After all, this is the eventual goal of nearly all MMO developers. I have seen online gaming evolve beyond anyone expectations over the past 2+ decades I have been watching and participating, and yet, there are still so much more immersion to come.

    Greater feedback (maybe via a suit to begin with, then sound and air projections working on your body) will enhance the realism, the environment created in a space, (as opposed to a pair of goggles), that give full peripheral vision.... then the icing on the cake, smell.
    Sure, you can add Minecraft + Second Life to the long list of inspirational games for us. But, actually our primary inspiration is from concept of Online 3D Virtual Malls {1 2 3 }. G.o.D is the interface to our Online Store. We approached the concept differently because we're Game Developers firstly. We did not want to develop a 3D Mall or attempt to replace them. Malls are for humans. In fact, I personally only go to the mall to get out of the house and see other people.

    We wanted to develop Game Worlds filled with adventure and support game development. UN-intuitive as it may sound, it was logical step to build a fully functional online store first (turnkey with Wordpress/Woocommerce software), followed by the game to communicate with it. So that's what we did.

    I do agree with your statement 'MMO's will grow in use and blend the borders between those environments currently used by business'. I would push that narrative even further by stating that The Automation Revolution will drive Human's into 'Virtual Economic Systems' evolved from their ancestors formerly known as MMOs.

    The dynamic of 1 directional exchange: player trades time and real world currency for virtual awards will be replaced by a true 2 directional exchange: player will trade time and real world currency for both virtual and real world items/currency. Countless Virtual Jobs and Businesses will spawn, that can only have value and exist in cyberspace. I would predict Cyber Generated Revenue (CGR) to over-take the concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI) because, Human require purpose to exist.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by BrUnO XaVIeR View Post
    Because they are unlikely to "grind" in a mmo again to only then begin enjoying the game, while games like Fortnite they can play the thing right out of the box and quit a match any time they have to without any serious consequences.

    I remember playing a MMO with them and just to get together 16 players ready to "raid" took over 3 hours then the raid itself took 4 more hours to finish because people make a mistake and the "party wipes" killing everyone...

    It's an absurd timesink for very little "fun" or "reward" ad they say.
    'Grindy' Game Mechanics are common in JRPG/RPGs. Massive Multiplayer Online RPGs were the first Games-As-A-Service and I suspect the RPG 'grind' was implemented as a strategy to support subscription and free-to-(pay) models. I understand the need for such monetization models, if the game is to have continuous content and feature updates. I also understand the need for some 'repeatable game mechanics and content, so players don't blow through the content rapidly.

    Taking your statement in consideration, in GOD of DREAMs, we're pursuing a gameplay design that removes the 'feeling' of grind, while adding the feeling of 'fun' and 'reward' for the time invested in playing. Our approach is incorporating Modular Arcade Style Combat and Puzzle Mechanics that are short that increase in engagement as they are repeated. Hopefully interesting mechanics will emerge from the combination of these mechanics. Wire up these the Reward/Penalty of these mechanics to a customizable Hierarchical Scoring System (aka Stats Progress) inspired by Incremental Games and Tabletop RPG Character Stats Sheets.

    We also believe that Creativity is driven by Boredom, and providing players collaborative tools to create (heavily customize) in-game content and mechanics will push the game beyond the normal playtime. This is why we started our development firstly building a collaborative construction system and its at the core of many of the content systems.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    My friends are dying for MMOs without an unnecessary time sink attached to it. Wow classic wastes time when it comes to raiding and a few of the endgame instances, but most of the game can be played in short bursts or even for longer periods easily and be enjoyable. Unless you are doing group material you can log out at anytime, and even then you can log out if you have to. In which they will just replace you. In MOBA's and competitive FPS its much more demanding of time. If you are trying to climb rank you will be locked into games until they are over which range from fifteen minutes to an hour with very little time to even go to the bathroom during game.

    There is still desire for good engaging MMOs unfortunately all the hurdles of making/financing one are stopping a lot of competition from entering the market. So we get a wow re-release and korean grind mmos. If the focus was less on wasting time and more on enjoying content, people would be all for it.


    Originally posted by TechLord View Post


    I personally think we need a new terms to represent Large and Small Scale Multiplayer Games and Network Design style. For example, this forum is a sort of Massive Multiuser Forum, a MMF, GOD of DREAMS isn't a traditional MMO, its more specifically a Managed Network of Player Hosted (Small Scale) Servers with a Server/Friend Location (Matchmaking) services to transfer clients from one Server Map to another. I would define it as a, Multiverse.
    This game is similar to roblox? Player generated worlds and content from a digital repository that can be built at run time.

    https://corp.roblox.com/2019/04/robl...ion-continues/

    It continues to grow and expand year on year. They are doing quite well.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    When I read your initial post, the first thing that surfaced in my thoughts was Minecraft. This was followed by Second Life/Opensim, then by most of the online games I play(ed), whereby some of those that create armour, mounts, pets etc get a % of the virtual selling price. Not every component is made in-house. Would it be fair to say that there are similarities? I ask because I was intrigued by your opening post Title.

    I personally believe MMO's will grow in use and blend the borders between those environments currently used by business, where reality is so paramount, they use the full stretch of today's technology to gain it. That technology, whilst out of reach to the average gamer for now, will soon become a reality. Feeling like you are there, will become so enriched when you realise the avatar beside you, is someone just like you, same goes for the whole team and not a puppet. After all, this is the eventual goal of nearly all MMO developers. I have seen online gaming evolve beyond anyone expectations over the past 2+ decades I have been watching and participating, and yet, there are still so much more immersion to come.

    Greater feedback (maybe via a suit to begin with, then sound and air projections working on your body) will enhance the realism, the environment created in a space, (as opposed to a pair of goggles), that give full peripheral vision.... then the icing on the cake, smell.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Because they are unlikely to "grind" in a mmo again to only then begin enjoying the game, while games like Fortnite they can play the thing right out of the box and quit a match any time they have to without any serious consequences.

    I remember playing a MMO with them and just to get together 16 players ready to "raid" took over 3 hours then the raid itself took 4 more hours to finish because people make a mistake and the "party wipes" killing everyone...

    It's an absurd timesink for very little "fun" or "reward" ad they say.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by BrUnO XaVIeR View Post
    Everybody I know personally moved with times and quit MMOs altogether.

    People these days want instant gratification for everything (social media effect), so yeah MMOs are kinda dead if you're not World of Warcraft or a niche Korean product, even those are facing harsh times.
    Hi BrUnO XaVIeR ,

    I want to give you my sincere thanks for your awesome Property Transfer Utility it is a Life Saver. In regards to MMOs being Dead, can you share your thoughts on WHY the individuals you know quit MMOs?

    I personally think we need a new terms to represent Large and Small Scale Multiplayer Games and Network Design style. For example, this forum is a sort of Massive Multiuser Forum, a MMF, GOD of DREAMS isn't a traditional MMO, its more specifically a Managed Network of Player Hosted (Small Scale) Servers with a Server/Friend Location (Matchmaking) services to transfer clients from one Server Map to another. I would define it as a, Multiverse.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Everybody I know personally moved with times and quit MMOs altogether.

    People these days want instant gratification for everything (social media effect), so yeah MMOs are kinda dead if you're not World of Warcraft or a niche Korean product, even those are facing harsh times.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Aquarian Rising View Post
    I realize that one would ideally pay fellow developers as they work on a project for/with one, but I'm not convinced that model need always be applied. Assuming it can be agreed upon at the onset of a project, hungry devs looking to get their teeth wet can sink them into a small or medium-size project and agree to a share of all earnings from said project. Of course there's a risk of the end result not earning much, but ultimately the quality of the underlying game concept and the production of assets, etc., are what will determine the success of the game, and these are very much factors under the control of those responsible for their creation. Anyhow, clicked to these posts from another thread where TechLord had linked to it. Saw this comment, felt I should give my two cents, whatever that's worth.
    I worked on several Royalty-based Projects, all which have died truly sad deaths. At this point, I'm not confident the model works at all. But, I have deep desire to prove that it does. I'm only interested in Royalties as its closer to having true equity and ownership in the creation. As strange as this sounds, I cannot do Game Dev like a Job.

    If the game concept is intriguing and the Lead Developer is fair and easy to communicate with, I would join and be motivated if supplied definitive tasks and can see rapid progress. Otherwise It will not work for myself. I'm aiming to be Lead Dev, that I want to have.

    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post
    It's extremely rare for that kind of project to ever work, even to get finished much less be any kind of success. There's too many problems, from lack of time to work on unpaid projects to lack of motivation to difficulty in getting good developers who would be interested in doing that, among many other things.
    Also, you can make a good game that doesn't make any money. Some of success is just due to luck and timing.
    From the experience I've had, I would agree it is Extremely Rare.It can be discouraging, but, I refused to quit. The term 'rare' suggests it is a possibility and pursuing that possbility, is where I'm finding strength and motivation to persevere. I have deep desire to prove that it Royatlty-based project can work and finish the Game. I want to do the near impossible or die trying. In regards to success, I'm certain Marketing plays a major role in success.

    Originally posted by Nawrot View Post
    And that imo. is reason to not make big games as indie dev. You easily can waste years on project that will never be finished or if finished will not make much money. When you start technology that you use may be top of the line, but at some point you stop upgrading engine, and before you are ready to publish game that tech may be very outdated.
    I'm guilty of all of the above, But, I don't view it as a complete waste. I learn many lessons and skills in the process and use those skills to my advantage in other areas to increase my professional value and income in my career. The only lesson I failed to learn was deep diving into super ambitious projects that may never see the light of day. These are the sort projects that attract me, as they are the sort of games I've played.

    I'm fully aware those games are developed by a gang of Developers at the top of their field. If I worried about that I wouldnt even attempt game development. I've developed a few short arcade games over the years. I'm challenging myself to dev something more advance/complex. Something that I want to Play.

    I develop modular subsystems so each is a little project within themselves. Completing a subsystem provides some gratification, even if the overall project dies. If the project dies, I just pickup my subsystems and migrate them into the next project. This requires me to shop for projects that will allow me to use and continue development with subsystems. Those projects are rare. So I dont join many projects.

    Although Subsystems provide some gratification, I will not be completely satisfied until I complete a Full Game using my concepts and commercially distribute to the masses. If all fails, I can commercially distribute my subsystems in Marketplaces.
    .
    Originally posted by ClavosTech View Post
    For sure that's true. But you also have to enjoy working on simpler ideas or you'll give up just as quickly.
    You also have to be able to think 'Small and Big', to break big concepts down into simpler game ideas.
    Both are hard, especially starting out, as you've no idea how long things will take or your own real ability.
    I concur with all of the above. I enjoy working on modular subsystems, which provide me a much smaller 'achievable' scope. The goal is to combine these subsystem into a 'Game'. The initials MMO insinuates 'ambitious' as it means Massive Multiplayer Online. But, today we have more options with pre created subsystems and content from marketplaces, procedural generation in dcc tools, powerful game development suites like unrealengine 4, and awesome communities like Unreal Forums. In my opinion, no dev truly develops alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    And that imo. is reason to not make big games as indie dev. You easily can waste years on project that will never be finished or if finished will not make much money. When you start technology that you use may be top of the line, but at some point you stop upgrading engine, and before you are ready to publish game that tech may be very outdated.
    For sure that's true. But you also have to enjoy working on simpler ideas or you'll give up just as quickly.
    You also have to be able to think 'Small and Big', to break big concepts down into simpler game ideas.
    Both are hard, especially starting out, as you've no idea how long things will take or your own real ability.
    Last edited by ClavosTech; 10-20-2019, 07:01 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post

    It's extremely rare for that kind of project to ever work, even to get finished much less be any kind of success. There's too many problems, from lack of time to work on unpaid projects to lack of motivation to difficulty in getting good developers who would be interested in doing that, among many other things.
    Also, you can make a good game that doesn't make any money. Some of success is just due to luck and timing.
    And that imo. is reason to not make big games as indie dev. You easily can waste years on project that will never be finished or if finished will not make much money. When you start technology that you use may be top of the line, but at some point you stop upgrading engine, and before you are ready to publish game that tech may be very outdated.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    During the process of Learning how to DISSECT Models (a) in the new Blender 2.8 (b) to convert Singular Meshes into Modular Meshes for Hyper-bashing / Customization, and simultaneously benchmark Modular Character Optimization (c) with the new Skeletal Mesh Merge C++ Plugin I just learned to write (d),
    I discovered ...

    How to Import UE4 Mann from Blender Without Extra 'Root' Bone.
    Blender Import No Extra Bone
    1. In Outline, Select Root.
    2. RMB Select Hierarchy.
    3. File > Export FBX
    4. In Export FBX Settings >
      1. Main Tab > Check Selected Objects
      2. Geometry Tab > Uncheck Apply Modifiers
      3. Amatures Tab > Uncheck Add Leaf Bones
      4. Animation Tab > Check ALL
    5. Name File and Select Export FBX
    Last edited by TechLord; 10-23-2019, 04:00 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by Aquarian Rising View Post

    I realize that one would ideally pay fellow developers as they work on a project for/with one, but I'm not convinced that model need always be applied. Assuming it can be agreed upon at the onset of a project, hungry devs looking to get their teeth wet can sink them into a small or medium-size project and agree to a share of all earnings from said project. Of course there's a risk of the end result not earning much, but ultimately the quality of the underlying game concept and the production of assets, etc., are what will determine the success of the game, and these are very much factors under the control of those responsible for their creation. Anyhow, clicked to these posts from another thread where TechLord had linked to it. Saw this comment, felt I should give my two cents, whatever that's worth.
    It's extremely rare for that kind of project to ever work, even to get finished much less be any kind of success. There's too many problems, from lack of time to work on unpaid projects to lack of motivation to difficulty in getting good developers who would be interested in doing that, among many other things.
    Also, you can make a good game that doesn't make any money. Some of success is just due to luck and timing.

    Leave a comment:

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