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  • replied
    Originally posted by Basement Bob View Post
    Just wondering as my projects increase in size what bottle necks could affect the editor usability?
    At what stage do editor slow downs kick in?
    I limit the size of blueprints(number of nodes/function per blueprint, specifically in pawns and controllers(50 functions for my 6yr old machine)) to avoid long compile times, and haven't experienced any issues in this regard, this was an issue a couple of years ago, to scared to revisit it

    What would you say are safe working limits and practices before slow downs occur? is there any specific area to be wary of?

    I would assume that working on mechanics and functionality would best be done in a simple project with basic materials and models, then all the heavy visual stuff done separately, bringing them all together for a final build, but while perfecting game-play creation/testing keep it simple. Avoid shaders needing to be complied until you are working on materials etc. That sort of thing.

    What am I asking? is the main issue blueprint related, texture amount or size, amount of meshes, or mesh density per level or displayed, does the viewport "far view plane" make a difference?


    What considerations do I need to think about as my project grows?
    Where are you guys hitting walls?

    Here's the thing, Unreal is never fast but it also never grinds to a halt with larger projects like Unity does. Game scaling literally depends on how much hardware you throw at it and UE tends to deal with it fine although experience cross platform is odd. On MacOS general performance (including rendering) has been pretty poor, Linux was okay but I experienced far more bugs than Windows.

    On Windows Unreal runs fine most of the time, again it's never fast but it's far from unusable.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by NilsonLima View Post

    I think it is "The Boy and His Kite" example you meant.

    Indeed, this project is a perfect example of big project, it is segmented to the point you won't see a complete scene when opening the editor, all will fit together once you run it.
    Well, you *can* load the whole thing, but you need around 24GB of memory. The biggest problem with that project is it makes use of distance fields, but they haven't been generated for the assets, so the first time you load it, it'll take a very, very long time. I think it took nearly an hour on an i7-4790k to load that scene!

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post
    Try opening the Open World example, it uses a massive amount of RAM, if you're doing a large game, then having enough RAM will become an issue. In general, having a faster CPU will make the editor work better
    I think it is "The Boy and His Kite" example you meant.

    Indeed, this project is a perfect example of big project, it is segmented to the point you won't see a complete scene when opening the editor, all will fit together once you run it.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Try opening the Open World example, it uses a massive amount of RAM, if you're doing a large game, then having enough RAM will become an issue. In general, having a faster CPU will make the editor work better

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Just wondering as my projects increase in size what bottle necks could affect the editor usability?
    At what stage do editor slow downs kick in?
    I limit the size of blueprints(number of nodes/function per blueprint, specifically in pawns and controllers(50 functions for my 6yr old machine)) to avoid long compile times, and haven't experienced any issues in this regard, this was an issue a couple of years ago, to scared to revisit it

    What would you say are safe working limits and practices before slow downs occur? is there any specific area to be wary of?

    I would assume that working on mechanics and functionality would best be done in a simple project with basic materials and models, then all the heavy visual stuff done separately, bringing them all together for a final build, but while perfecting game-play creation/testing keep it simple. Avoid shaders needing to be complied until you are working on materials etc. That sort of thing.

    What am I asking? is the main issue blueprint related, texture amount or size, amount of meshes, or mesh density per level or displayed, does the viewport "far view plane" make a difference?


    What considerations do I need to think about as my project grows?
    Where are you guys hitting walls?




    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by SJO3000 View Post
    So the solution from epic games to make UE4 faster and not crash is to buy a new computer?
    I know that a number of people have issues running UE4 games on machines with integrated graphics and a dedicated GPU simply because the integrated graphics was used instead of their much more powerful dedicated GPU.

    If you were to share your specs, perhaps we could assist you.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post

    3ds Max does not have tens of millions of users, it's really close to around 1 million
    I stand corrected.


    Originally posted by darthviper107 View Post

    I do think it has a higher impact than Unity, but Unity is really a barebones program
    Perhaps a better solution is to have shortcuts for development process in terms of having the engine configured based on what you wish to develop on.

    If its mobile then the shortcut will take you to an editor with project settings tweaked for that, if its console/pc then you will get similar, if its console/pc/VR then another and so on.

    I find myself having to dig through a whole list of android and mac plugins to disable them and then go through project settings and read about every bit of what i need to disable from shadows to lights to index buffers etc.

    Or why not spare everyone the trouble and do the opposite start bare bones like Unity and just add what you need and not the other way around.



    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by William K View Post

    Sorry, wrong assessment. I have been using 3ds max and Maya and before that Cinema4d for over 20 years I know the software in and out and their progression of pros and cons in time. and while 3ds max alone has 10's of millions of users, only a few hundred are vocal in the forums of the real issues in performance and of those few you got only a handful of individuals who are dedicated active posters.

    So the fact that UE4 or any other program has millions of users and few are vocal about the problems mean nothing and here's why:

    1 - Most users are hobbyist or worst yet students and don't care or can't tell the difference between good and bad performance vs what is norm they just don't have the experience to tell, they might just say they need better computers and end of story, or they will just accept it as normal because they don't know any better.

    2 - Many users don't even make games in UE4, maybe work Archviz and other related work, and believe me that Archviz guys are the least picky people, they still use Autocad for gods sake! Have you worked on that thing!? They wouldn't be able to tell if the engine stuttered or just defaulted, as long as they can import and render they don't care.

    3 - Most users simply don't care to put even a second to sign up around here and post especially when they can afford not to: Engine problem? no problem hire more programmers let them deal with it.

    4 - Most users are not trying to make a living making a video game using this engine!

    That last point is important.
    3ds Max does not have tens of millions of users, it's really close to around 1 million and that's the most popular 3D program in the industry (which tells you a lot about how big the industry is in general)

    I would bet that most people who have downloaded UE4 don't use it at all, they're just checking it out, but even then, if there were pervasive issues with performance then there would be a lot more issues posted here. I do think it has a higher impact than Unity, but Unity is really a barebones program that you fill with the things you want to do, by default it's not doing as much as UE4 anyway.

    Also, AutoCad does suck, oh my god is it bad

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    hi
    i have a Core I5 2400, gtx 650 (2gb), 12gb ram and i can run ue4 super smoothly

    i've done alot of optimization on windows so it hardly uses anything (i dont even let windows update, i'm still in a 2017 version of windows)
    i have no problems with shader compiling either, its fast and finishes super quick (unless i have 5000+ shaders compiling, then it would take ~5min)

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    So Epic Games gives the "it's not me it's you," routine when it comes to problems. -F rating.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by BaronPain View Post

    What's wrong with Autocad?





    Yes, this point is important. Sooo ... if you have so many problems with the engine, why exactly are you still using it? It's quite obvious you are a Unity fan.
    1 - Autocad is a dinosaur with an archaic way of working, nothing wrong with that just saying that archviz guys are not picky they don't care, oh and not to mention every Autocad file I have received in the past required a day of cleaning polys and faces, practically a whole skin job all over.

    2 - Not a fan of any software, too old for that. But also not an argument, I use UE4 because there are features that I need right now relevant to the project at hand. Notably because of BPs, if Unity had an equally powerful integrated visual scripting I can assure you we would've switched a while ago.

    3 - Unity is a good comparison on what they are doing right vs what Epic needs to look into. One of them is the way they are working on their new UI and editor performance, lack of crashes relatively and bugs and so on.
    Originally posted by NilsonLima View Post

    From the previous post I am sure I stated the word "unbearable", so I think the usability is still under that point.

    I can't say or speculate what others are doing with the engine, because most of the time I will be wrong (I remember not giving a sh_t for Fortnite while it was only a page inside Epic's website and turned out it is a world success), but I know that whenever I use software like Maya and 3DS Max, working in huge things, you can't deal with a "let's play in the park" type of PC, and surely people who own a PC capable of running those software for doing film (Maya) really don't have issues with Unreal being slow (my case as film is my thing).

    I know many people nowadays are working to become the future game developers and they are worried as hell because it takes time to learn, takes time if things doesn't work, takes even more time if software crashes constantly while they can't afford the best setup to run all these software. I never agreed that the engine is performing great, I do want that it have to become less "crashier" and have less bugs when a new release is launched. The only thing I do is to provide bug reports and sample projects whenever I have an issue detected and from the dozen reports I think I have seen only two of them fixed along 3 years.

    There are people that only know is to complain and do nothing to help developers to see what their complaints are about. I do blame developers to not at least try to do something with the "recommended" hardware spec and see that it is not enough! I really think that spec should be worked to be something different depending on what the person is planing to do with the engine, and it just can't be any Mac that will handle it, it can't be any Windows notebook that will handle it (I would really recommend to explicit remove Windows notebooks from the list) and few hardware options for development. Things will get worst as time goes by because the engine code only grows and hardly is having time devoted to make it smaller and optimized at editor level.
    I use multiple film level hardware here as stated previously (more than one machine with more than one having identical specs), sure you absolutely need high specs for the engine but as stated earlier the engine is getting bloated, something similar that happened with Max and Maya. But again what is a bit more frustrating is the fact that while you can argue that Max and Maya are software written 2 decades ago UE4 has been entirely rewritten just recently and if its getting bloated like this now, then it is a point of concern.

    In another example for the sake of those with lower spec machines and to add food for thought, I can run latest Unity on a gaming laptop and even work on it just fine but there is no way I can run basic unreal example files in a gaming laptop and not have the thing scream at me to stop.

    Anyway I'm done going over these points again. There is clearly an issue here which is why some of us are voicing our opinion and concerns, It is not a deal breaker but it is a question mark. Other than that it's up to Epic. It's their company and software.
    Last edited by William K; 01-26-2019, 12:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by William K View Post

    4 - Most users are not trying to make a living making a video game using this engine!

    That last point is important.
    From the previous post I am sure I stated the word "unbearable", so I think the usability is still under that point.

    I can't say or speculate what others are doing with the engine, because most of the time I will be wrong (I remember not giving a sh_t for Fortnite while it was only a page inside Epic's website and turned out it is a world success), but I know that whenever I use software like Maya and 3DS Max, working in huge things, you can't deal with a "let's play in the park" type of PC, and surely people who own a PC capable of running those software for doing film (Maya) really don't have issues with Unreal being slow (my case as film is my thing).

    I know many people nowadays are working to become the future game developers and they are worried as hell because it takes time to learn, takes time if things doesn't work, takes even more time if software crashes constantly while they can't afford the best setup to run all these software. I never agreed that the engine is performing great, I do want that it have to become less "crashier" and have less bugs when a new release is launched. The only thing I do is to provide bug reports and sample projects whenever I have an issue detected and from the dozen reports I think I have seen only two of them fixed along 3 years.

    There are people that only know is to complain and do nothing to help developers to see what their complaints are about. I do blame developers to not at least try to do something with the "recommended" hardware spec and see that it is not enough! I really think that spec should be worked to be something different depending on what the person is planing to do with the engine, and it just can't be any Mac that will handle it, it can't be any Windows notebook that will handle it (I would really recommend to explicit remove Windows notebooks from the list) and few hardware options for development. Things will get worst as time goes by because the engine code only grows and hardly is having time devoted to make it smaller and optimized at editor level.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by William K View Post
    2 - Many users don't even make games in UE4, maybe work Archviz and other related work, and believe me that Archviz guys are the least picky people, they still use Autocad for gods sake! Have you worked on that thing!? They wouldn't be able to tell if the engine stuttered or just defaulted, as long as they can import and render they don't care.
    What's wrong with Autocad?



    Originally posted by William K View Post
    4 - Most users are not trying to make a living making a video game using this engine!

    That last point is important.
    Yes, this point is important. Sooo ... if you have so many problems with the engine, why exactly are you still using it? It's quite obvious you are a Unity fan.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    Originally posted by NilsonLima View Post
    UE4 had in 2016 1.5 million users added on top of already UE3 users... its been 3 years since that, if it was so unbearable to use, we would have thousands of posts of complaints, meaning people are using good hardware to deal with the slowness. It is also important to note, that many people use UE4 with Maya, Blender or 3DS Max (a good example is the livelink with UE4 and Maya and now added to Unreal Studio with several other plugins) and those software already demands a good machine and these same people want to have them loaded at same time, so every 3D computer artist already knows that productivity comes when you can gain time by having multiple applications loaded at same time, so you will need a robust machine if you want to be productive and have no headaches.
    Sorry, wrong assessment. I have been using 3ds max and Maya and before that Cinema4d for over 20 years I know the software in and out and their progression of pros and cons in time. and while 3ds max alone has 10's of millions of users, only a few hundred are vocal in the forums of the real issues in performance and of those few you got only a handful of individuals who are dedicated active posters.

    So the fact that UE4 or any other program has millions of users and few are vocal about the problems mean nothing and here's why:

    1 - Most users are hobbyist or worst yet students and don't care or can't tell the difference between good and bad performance vs what is norm they just don't have the experience to tell, they might just say they need better computers and end of story, or they will just accept it as normal because they don't know any better.

    2 - Many users don't even make games in UE4, maybe work Archviz and other related work, and believe me that Archviz guys are the least picky people, they still use Autocad for gods sake! Have you worked on that thing!? They wouldn't be able to tell if the engine stuttered or just defaulted, as long as they can import and render they don't care.

    3 - Most users simply don't care to put even a second to sign up around here and post especially when they can afford not to: Engine problem? no problem hire more programmers let them deal with it.

    4 - Most users are not trying to make a living making a video game using this engine!

    That last point is important.

    Leave a comment:


  • replied
    UE4 had in 2016 1.5 million users added on top of already UE3 users... its been 3 years since that, if it was so unbearable to use, we would have thousands of posts of complaints, meaning people are using good hardware to deal with the slowness. It is also important to note, that many people use UE4 with Maya, Blender or 3DS Max (a good example is the livelink with UE4 and Maya and now added to Unreal Studio with several other plugins) and those software already demands a good machine and these same people want to have them loaded at same time, so every 3D computer artist already knows that productivity comes when you can gain time by having multiple applications loaded at same time, so you will need a robust machine if you want to be productive and have no headaches.

    Leave a comment:

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