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  • Can i call my self a programmer?

    Hi,

    Well i have been doing unreal for a while now, and this question bothers me quite badly in my mind.
    It quite bothers me if i am a programmer or not because:
    -I use 80% blueprint
    -50% of my code/blueprints are made up from blueprint snippets around the net.(like keypress detecting, mouse position to terrain position conversion)
    -i sometimes have to google the most basic things like: How to detect if i click an actor with the mouse, and how materials work and such.

    So what bothers me is, can i call myself a programmer when i do the above things?
    And if i later get a programming job(i'm 19) is it ok if i sometimes have to google things(like how to do something, or a little script)?
    Or is it just like "we're ok with it as long as it works and you don't violate licenses"?

    And do you also sometimes just use snippets(less then 10-20 nodes like me) of blueprint because it is easier or you just dont know how else to do it?




    thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by lalala312 View Post
    Hi,

    Well i have been doing unreal for a while now, and this question bothers me quite badly in my mind.
    It quite bothers me if i am a programmer or not because:
    -I use 80% blueprint
    -50% of my code/blueprints are made up from blueprint snippets around the net.(like keypress detecting, mouse position to terrain position conversion)
    -i sometimes have to google the most basic things like: How to detect if i click an actor with the mouse, and how materials work and such.

    So what bothers me is, can i call myself a programmer when i do the above things?
    And if i later get a programming job(i'm 19) is it ok if i sometimes have to google things(like how to do something, or a little script)?
    Or is it just like "we're ok with it as long as it works and you don't violate licenses"?

    And do you also sometimes just use snippets(less then 10-20 nodes like me) of blueprint because it is easier or you just dont know how else to do it?




    thanks
    You can call yourself Dave if you like.
    If you ask me seriously.Your definitely a programmer when you don't have to ask other people if you are, and you tell them what you are.
    So the tldr is "You know if your a programmer."
    As long as it works, and it's a clean build your good.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by thadkinsjr View Post

      You can call yourself Dave if you like.
      If you ask me seriously.Your definitely a programmer when you don't have to ask other people if you are, and you tell them what you are.
      So the tldr is "You know if your a programmer."
      As long as it works, and it's a clean build your good.
      Well, i guess i am a programmer, so copying some pieces of code sometimes isnt bad?

      And can maybe someone replie to my other questions as well?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by lalala312 View Post

        Well, i guess i am a programmer, so copying some pieces of code sometimes isnt bad?

        And can maybe someone replie to my other questions as well?
        Copying code isnt bad. Someone posted it for you to use. So long as your still learning what your looking at.
        I think it's worse to just copy something, and not understand it. If there's a bug then how will you know how to fix it?
        I think your asking about the job ???
        If someone gives you a job, and assigns you a task, and you complete it.
        Does it matter to them if you pulled it from google, or github? No.
        If they wanted you to add something to it, which isn't published, and you can't figure it out. Your busted.
        So if you pay an artist to make you some nice stylized materials, and they swipe free stock textures from a site. Are you still satisfied?
        They made you nice materials. Sounds a bit shady, but someone is still using there time, and doing the work for you.
        No one should work for free. Regardless. I don't mind paying people for their time, and work.


        Comment


        • #5
          I don't consider myself a "real programmer"...
          Because, although I've built many systems and gameplay code for games I don't like to mention (mobile ****, some Pc and Ps4 **** too), I've never participated in any major AAA project so I consider myself just an average 'wannabe'.
          For example: ILM posted job offers in these same forums right here which I don't qualify.
          But, that is on me, though.

          If you consider yourself a programmer then that's what you are. What others say doesn't matter.

          Which tools you use or can you code without google open or not is irrelevant to this matter (unless you want to work for a studio you're a fan of, then in this case, their internal philosophies must be your goals).

          Btw, if you don't have passion for what you do, programming, then you're not programmer even if you're doing it as a job... because passion is all it takes to be whatever you want.
          | Finite State Machine | Object-Pool Plugin | Auto-Save Plugin | Anti-Cheat Plugin |

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lalala312 View Post
            So what bothers me is, can i call myself a programmer when i do the above things?
            Depends on who you ask really, its all relative dude...


            A hardcore coder specializing in UE4 ..or.. Linux-OS ..or.. AV / Stuxnet might say:
            The coder is the one who didn't post here but took home the source to study daily.
            A guy who lives breathes C++ 7 days/week 365 days/year. Knows 10 languages.
            Blueprints? Even Javascript / VBA macros / DOS batch files are harder than that!


            A recruiter or hiring manger (technical and non-technical) might say:
            Long before Stack-Overflow / Github, devs shared libraries, so its ok to copy / source code.
            Just get the work done well / fast and be honest, don't take credit for code that isn't yours etc.
            Security is a way bigger issue now, so better to know your limits plus the code's limitations!
            Don't worry about 'titles' we call everyone developers here, there's no meaningful distinction.
            Understanding problems, building timely solutions is what matters, and pay is the same etc.


            The smug class hacker 'genius' or social media troll might say:
            You're just another wannabee / loser / imitator. Can't function without copying code!
            Then, they in-turn go on to write a decade's worth of code that's full of Zero-Days.
            Or shoddy code that's responsible for the next high profile hack (Equifax / Swift etc)...


            Conclusion? You're asking the wrong question:
            No matter what, hardcore purists will probably never see you as a real programmer...
            You're just another wannabee-imitator. But don't let that eat at you, it doesn't matter.
            Why? You're still a Developer... You can create things / You've got skills regardless.
            Getting rated as a coder is typical from class room to social media to dark web etc...
            But its pointless as a measure of value in the workplace, as everything is practical!
            So try to forget over-thinking 'am I a programmer'.. Ask instead, what is it: I do well...
            Ask what am I good at creating quickly / reliably, what's my best area of Blueprints?...
            Last edited by franktech; 11-03-2017, 12:29 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lalala312 View Post
              Hi,

              Well i have been doing unreal for a while now, and this question bothers me quite badly in my mind.
              It quite bothers me if i am a programmer or not because:
              -I use 80% blueprint
              -50% of my code/blueprints are made up from blueprint snippets around the net.(like keypress detecting, mouse position to terrain position conversion)
              -i sometimes have to google the most basic things like: How to detect if i click an actor with the mouse, and how materials work and such.

              So what bothers me is, can i call myself a programmer when i do the above things?
              And if i later get a programming job(i'm 19) is it ok if i sometimes have to google things(like how to do something, or a little script)?
              Or is it just like "we're ok with it as long as it works and you don't violate licenses"?

              And do you also sometimes just use snippets(less then 10-20 nodes like me) of blueprint because it is easier or you just dont know how else to do it?




              thanks
              In the industry, you'd be referred to as something like a Scripter.

              Googling is half the job in a technical discipline, seriously. I have 12 years experience, and I still spend a lot of time looking up various math formulae etc.

              Comment


              • #8
                thanks for all your replys!
                Well, i fell a litle better now.
                I guess i am a programmer because i can program like 10 languages.
                I understand the mains of the programming language like how to print to a screen and calculating.(i can write Hello World in 10 languages and do variables and calculating things)
                Its just that i still need to learn apis(like c++ in unreal requires you to also learn unreal specific things)
                And if i would solicitate for a job and say i know like 10 languages, i think i can say i am a programmer.
                As like i said, i can do variables, printing to console, structures, and defining functions and classes.(so that makes me a programmer i think.)
                SO one last question:
                Does knowing a language also mean you need to know atleast one api(for example unreal engine specific functions in c++)?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lalala312 View Post
                  SO one last question:
                  Does knowing a language also mean you need to know atleast one api(for example unreal engine specific functions in c++)?
                  Usually yes...

                  API's are listed on the job sheet as requirements, normally in order of priority and are often highly ambitious / detailed .
                  HR and Recruiters are like AI / chat-robots and also tend to ask for 10 years experience on a tool that's been around 2!
                  So don't be put off... Even if an API is premium and not easily available, do some reading, learn to talk about the API etc.
                  Workplaces often 'ask for more' (unrealistically) to screen out bluffers, but there's plenty of coding jobs world-wide atm.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi lalala312,

                    YES you are a programmer and a very efficient one at that. You're learning and application is optimized.

                    Good Programmers Copy, Great programmers Steal.
                    [UNPAID] TechLord - Blueprints Application Guru seeking cool Games to work on (Offer Ends 11/30/17)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, I have to say no way, I'm not the guy who's going to lie to you to boost your ego. If you like what you're doing and put your time into you'll be a programmer. Matter fact programmer is false, you want to be called a computer scientist. So young obi one use the light I've spoken and become stronger.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you are programming then you are a programmer, simple really.

                        How much you can do without using Google is only a measure of how much external reliance you have. And to be honest if you have never Googled for assistance or a solution then you are probably lying, or you are not utilising a good source of information. In my earlier days of programming we never had internet, we used books/manuals or spoke to colleagues, and there were no easy solutions out there.

                        Bottom line, you're a programmer, not matter what any self-important high level programmer might tell you

                        Cheers

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          okay, thanks you all for the replys!
                          It really helped me.

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