Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help a teacher. UE4 Vs Unity for learning games development in a class environment.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by FrankieV View Post
    Well I think trying to convince anyone based on feature sets is a lost cause as what would make the difference would be a dollar cost break down as to per-seat requirements.

    In Unreal 4's favor is access to all is free and payment only required if a game is being sold so all of your students will have access to the same tool sets used by Indy pros with out additional cost be it at home or school.

    Unity's feature sets change based on which version you opt for so even if there is a free version to get the full Monty you would have to purchase the pro version at $125 per seat per month. Gets expensive so the first thing to do is to see if there is student licensing
    For Unity the free version would be sufficient

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by HavocX View Post
      Are there any prerequisites for the course, like basic programming skills?
      Sorry for the late response having something of a mad week, no, no programming skills required what so ever.

      So far they have spent much of their time learning an engine called construct 2 (one which i am not familiar with at all but appears to be sub-par from my limited perspective.) I think the thinking behind it is that they would pick up basic programming from that.

      It is a games design course not a game art or game programming course so I do think there needs to be some programming learned.

      Comment


      • #18
        Construct2 is a stricly 2D engine, so it can't really be compared to UE4.

        If they have extended the basic functionality of Construct2 using Javascript they may be ready for the C# in Unity. Otherwise blueprint all the way...

        Comment


        • #19
          Is using both an option?

          Originally posted by Eightshot View Post
          It is a games design course not a game art or game programming course so I do think there needs to be some programming learned.
          Don't know how practical this is for you, but I would offer a mix of Unity and Unreal....
          I mean that's what us devs do when deciding which engine is best for a given project.
          Assemble Freebies + Marketplace + Asset-Store packs, then show off some fun things.

          If you don't opt for this, then you only show either Visual Programming or Text Coding.
          You also don't highlight gotchas of game design from different axis to different editors.
          Students also won't see where one engine excels over another (strengths / weaknesses).

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Eightshot View Post
            SSo far they have spent much of their time learning an engine called construct 2 (one which i am not familiar with at all but appears to be sub-par from my limited perspective.) I think the thinking behind it is that they would pick up basic programming from that.
            blimey, doesnt really sell the course, Alice 3 might have been better

            ue4 is awesome but takes a while to get the hang of.
            blueprints are good but quirky and easily turn to spaghetti
            programming c++ is on the more hardcore end of the scale but probably better for future job prospects

            unity is easier and does the job well enough
            c# is fairly easy and documentation/examples are very well covered
            tegleg.co.uk - indie electronic music label
            Android + HTML5 WIP Physics Game
            PC Games - Old Android Music Apps

            Comment


            • #21
              Tegleg, Got to be honest here, not trying to sell the course, I'm unimpressed with almost every aspect of it so far. It's only redeeming feature is that it is only AS and A level (which i think is the equivalent of a high school diploma in the US if that helps) and i think the place im at is one of the first institutions to teach it specifically at this level. (usually people get introduced to the subject at foundation degree or HND level.)

              franktech, for me personally its totally impracticle as the only coding i can do is Blueprints. Im not a coder by any stretch of the imagination. On the other hand the other course tutor who is teaching them unity is adept at C# and C++. You do have to keep in mind that these are school leavers and generally fairly young. They seem to have had some difficulty absorbing the information they have been provided so far so i think including UE4 and unity together (although i agree it would be a brilliant opportunity for them) would possibly be a bit too much for them to take in all in the same space of time.

              HavocX, to my knowledge they used construct2 as a vanilla product only.

              Comment


              • #22
                These discussions drive me up the **** wall when I hear nonsense like "Unity was easier for me" "Unreal is complicated". Both of these statements are false. It's like saying "Photoshop is too complicated...Paint is easier"

                Unity only seems easier to use for people because it comes with 10% of the tools you need to build an actual game. It eases you in (to the asset store). Once you bring it up to the level of functionality that core Unreal has through the asset store, all bets are off. Mixed workflows. Bugs. Higher up front cost. The only thing at that point that is easier is perhaps C# vs C++, but even that is debatable because Unreal C++ isn't much different from Unity C#.

                Unity is worthless as a Game Engine (out of the box). Unity is only a PLATFORM to milk money out of the Asset store. Unreal is a fully featured game engine.


                If they push hard for Unity, be sure to cost in all of the assets that will be required per seat for missing or poor functionality; such as behavior trees (AI), pathfinding, material editor, level design, multiplayer, level streaming....I think you get the idea.
                Last edited by alg0801; 05-19-2017, 10:07 AM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Honestly, whatever does the job better is what matters--for some people Unity may genuinely be easier for the project they are doing. Unity is definitely simpler which can be a problem but in some cases that's a definite advantage if you're doing something that targets low-end systems and you don't need a lot of extra features. It is a struggle though to try and match the same features of UE4.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    There are pros and cons for sure. You should instead focus on the learning outcome and pick different tools for that. I have seen people use both Unity, Rpg Maker, Unreal, Stingray and other engines within the same degree or course. Even if you focus on one engine, often the students will favour the other. So rather than specifying the engine, you could allow them to pick the one they prefer themselves. One of the argument for doing level design using Unreal Engine (Unreal Editor) is that if you use the Unreal Editor you could essentially use existing assets and content to populate your level. If the students have to do everything on their own anyway, such as programming and modeling then Unity is probably better as it has less distraction. That said, both engine can do the same thing but the main difference is that Unity requires extra cost for visual scripting plugin.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X